March AARP Bulletin: Are your Social Security Benefits at Risk? The Truth about the Agency’s Health and What Can Be Done to Strengthen It

March AARP Bulletin: Are your Social Security Benefits at Risk? The Truth about the Agency’s Health and What Can Be Done to Strengthen It

WASHINGTONToday, the savings accounts from which Social Security draws funds to pay the 60-plus million people receiving benefits are worth almost $3 trillion. In 12 years, that number is projected to be zero, due in large part to a surge in the number of retirees not matched by the growth of jobs in America. If those Trust Funds get depleted as projected, Americans could face the first slash in promised benefits in the program’s history.

What exactly is going on? And more importantly, what can be done to shore up a program that is both beloved and essential to so many Americans?

The AARP Bulletin sent out a team of esteemed journalists to look at the health and future of Social Security from several angles and to detail what choices need to be made by Congress to guarantee full benefits to all who have earned them, in perpetuity. It’s work that must be done: Without Social Security, 21.7 million more Americans would be below the poverty line. Some 40 percent of retired Americans rely entirely on the monthly income it provides. And the program is nearly universally supported across the political spectrum.

But the steps needed to stabilize the program’s finances – some level of benefit cuts, revenue increases or both – are politically challenging. The Bulletin provides a comprehensive look at what those choices are and details the next steps likely to occur to take on the challenge.

Also learn in the cover story:

  • 6 crucial facts to know about Social Security that may help you get more value from it;
  • Why customer service is deteriorating at the agency, and what plans it has to improve;
  • 5 tips for calling SSA customer support and getting the help you need.  

Plus: When To Start Taking Social Security Benefits? Many financial professionals believe that you should wait until 70 to start receiving Social Security benefits. But there are compelling arguments for taking your retirement checks earlier. We asked two financial advisers to list the pros and cons of taking Social Security at 70 versus when you’ve reached full retirement age.

Also in the March issue:

Your Health

  • Gaining Weight as You Age Is Avoidable and Even Reversible: Extra protein, when eaten at the right time, could be an effective way to shed those extra pounds while preserving muscle. This month learn about AARP’s new book, ‘The Whole Body Reset,’ which discusses how protein timing can lead to better health and more energy.
  • Why Age and Alcohol Don’t Mix: Have you started drinking more during the pandemic? If so, you are not alone. During the pandemic, 14% of older adults reported increasing alcohol consumption, according to a national survey by University of Michigan researchers. Read this month’s issue to learn the effects of alcohol on your body as you age and when to limit your consumption.

Fraud Watch

  • Don’t Let FOMO Trip You Up: Do you have FOMO (fear of missing out)? The phenomenon is more than just a catch phrase – it can influence people to make hasty decisions that can make them more susceptible to scammers. Read this month’s “Fraud Watch” to learn tips for stopping scammers in their tracks.

Your Money

  • An Honest Guide to Digital Financial Tools: Whether it’s sending money to family, tipping, budgeting, or paying your bills: There’s an app for that. Every financial task you can imagine has been digitized. But is digital always better? In this month’s “Your Money,” we hear from financial professionals about the risks and benefits of the digital options for five common money activities.  
  • Good As New? When to Buy Refurbished: Inflation? Shortages? No problem! You may get what you want at prices you’ll love if you shop for refurbished items. Buying used or pre-owned can save you up to as much as 70% of the item’s market price. This month’s issue help you determine if buying used is something that you should start doing.

Your Life

  • Q&A with Good Morning America’s Robin Roberts: In this month’s Q&A, the familiar anchor and author of new book ‘Brighter by the Day’ details how she finds joy while facing a life-threatening disease. Robin discusses her childhood, her experience going public with her illness, and much more.

###

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Exclusively From AARP The Magazine: Halle Berry On How She Found Her Groove in Her 50s, Dolly Parton and James Patterson Team Up For A New Novel and Album, and More

Exclusively From AARP The Magazine: Halle Berry On How She Found Her Groove in Her 50s, Dolly Parton and James Patterson Team Up For A New Novel and Album, and More

Plus: John Mellencamp’s Tips For Living Your Best Life, Tools to a Successful Tax Season, and Secrets to a Big Vacation on a Little Budget

WASHINGTONIn the February/March issue of AARP The Magazine, cover star Halle Berry chats about her latest project and directorial debut film “Bruised,” rock hitmaker John Mellencamp shares a look at his retirement, “Hot In Cleveland” actress Valerie Bertinelli shares her most notable life lessons, and unexpected collaborators Dolly Parton and James Patterson talk about “Run, Rose, Run,” their new novel and accompanying soundtrack. 

Also, an insightful break down of the latest robocall scam, 10 important warning signs that you may have heart disease and an informative guide to visiting America’s biggest cities on a budget – all in the February/March 2022 issue of AARP The Magazine.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Halle Berry

Fresh off the heels of her latest film “Bruised,” ATM caught up with Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-winning actress Halle Berry, diving into her “life-changing” role and directorial debut. Globally known and celebrated for her captivating performances, the actress also shared an intimate look into her home life, opening up about how she has recently found balance and bliss as a parent, partner and professional. She looks ahead optimistically, touching on true connection, inner beauty, feminism, equality and diversity.

Valerie Bertinelli

The “Hot In Cleveland” actress breaks down the greatest lessons she has learned in her 6 decades, offering candid insight into her connection to food and culinary education from her late ex-husband’s mother, how she owns her regrets, why she doesn’t take things personally, the importance of feeling your feelings, and more.

John Mellencamp’s 7 Tips for Living Your Best Life

The 70-year-old rock star shares his secrets to productivity and problem-solving, meaningful friendships, and the importance of continuing to create something everyday.

Dolly Parton and James Patterson on forthcoming novel and soundtrack “Run, Rose, Run”

Thriller writer James Patterson and country music legend Dolly Parton chat with ATM about their unexpected collaboration, forthcoming novel and accompanying soundtrack “Run, Rose, Run,” which is said to be amongst the most creative book-writing partnerships out there. The novel hits stands March 7.

The Movies For Grownups® Awards 20th Anniversary Celebration

For two decades, AARP’s Movies for Grownups program has championed movies for grownups, by grownups, by advocating for the 50-plus audience, fighting industry ageism and encouraging films that resonate with older viewers. Get acquainted with the top movies, TV shows and talented people who have been nominated for the upcoming awards show.

“The Whole Body Reset”: Your New, Science-Backed Weight Loss Plan

You don’t have to gain weight as you age. That’s the novel idea behind “The Whole Body Reset.” The plan presents stunning new evidence about the power of “protein timing” for people at midlife, refutes the myth of slowing metabolisms, and changes the way people in their 40s and older should think about food. Read an exclusive excerpt of the upcoming AARP book in this issue of ATM.

Health Report – 10 Sneaky Signs You May Have Heart Disease

If you are experiencing bad breath, swollen ankles or hip pain, you may be noticing the early signs of heart disease. AARP’s health experts identify 10 little known signs to watch out for that may indicate the presence of heart disease.

Money Special – The Only Tax Guide You’ll Ever Need in Your 50s 

With tax day approaching, AARP’s resident financial and money specialists reveal whether you can save more on your income taxes this year; share 10 crucial truths about our tax system; give the lowdown on how to reduce property and sales taxes; and help you improve your thinking – and possibly, get a little more mellow – about taxes in general.

Fraud Watch – The Truth About Police-Support Calls

AARP’s Doug Shadel warns you to be wary of the latest telemarketing blitz in America – police-support calls. While persuasive callers may position their request as a charity initiative, many are actually from organizations that pocket virtually all the money. These “scam Political Action Committees” operate on the edge of the law, with little oversight. Here’s how to respond to such calls, and find out for yourself how to best support your local police.

Big Cities on Little Budgets

The secret to an awesome vacation in Chicago, New York or Los Angeles without spending a fortune? Act like a local! Travel writers living in these and other major U.S. cities share their secrets for enjoying their home town by skipping the tourist traps and finding the hidden (and low-cost) joys, be it food, activities, or neighborhoods to stay in.

Blue Collar by Day, Red Carpet by Night

Albanian immigrants Tefta Bejko and Bujar Alimani share their real-life story of working service jobs in order to support their family and fund their award-winning films. Against the challenges they have faced, the couple has perservered to fulfill the needs of their family and achieve their dreams in Hollywood.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-Winning Actress Halle Berry Opens Up About How She Found Happiness and Balance at 55

Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-Winning Actress Halle Berry Opens Up About How She Found Happiness and Balance at 55

LOS ANGELESFresh off the heels of her latest film Bruised, Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-winning actress Halle Berry spent time with AARP The Magazine (ATM) to talk about her “life-changing” role, directorial debut and evolving career directions. Globally known and celebrated for her captivating performances, the actress also shared an intimate look into her home life, opening up about her long path to joy as a parent, partner and professional. In the exclusive ATM cover story, she looks ahead optimistically, noting that for the first time in decades, she has achieved balance between her professional, family and emotional lives.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s February/March 2022 cover story featuring Halle Berry. The issue is available in homes starting in February and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On lessons in motherhood:

“My kids have been my greatest teachers. Before the world silences them, they’re truth tellers. And if as adults we’re present and we listen to what they’re saying, we can learn a lot about ourselves and about the world we live in.”

On representation and diversity in Hollywood:

“Women of color are doing things, and you know what? They’re doing things on their own terms, in their way, and on projects that are reflective of them or their culture or their gender. They’re daring to say, “I deserve this.””

On finding true love and real connection in the midst of quarantine:

“We spent four months talking on the phone. We were forced to let only our brains connect and discover if we had a connection before our bodies decided to get involved. I’d never done it this way. I fell in love with his mind, his conversation. I really believe I’ve found my person.”

On making her directorial debut:

“Directors I respected told me, “For your directorial debut, let it be something you love and something you know about.” From the moment I read the script, it was a part of me. I was aching to tell it.”

On maintaining the female perspective in “Bruised”:

“I was determined not just to hire as many women as I could, but to also make sure that the story stayed very female and was told from a specific female point of view, that we talk about things that are very feminine. We went to dark places because that’s what women do. That’s our sensibility. I also wanted an all-female soundtrack and female composer, so that the sound of this film that supported these characters in this world would be female.”

On addressing domestic violence authentically in her work:

“This story was a world I knew—domestic violence, for one thing. Not only have I worked with a shelter for 25 years, but it’s how I grew up as a young child, with an alcoholic, violent father. As a kid, I saw my mother beaten up and I know the horror and helplessness a kid feels. I remember my mother feeling humiliated by what her children had to witness. While some people might watch it and think, That’s harsh, it felt normal to me, which is how I knew it was true.”

On her relationship with her mom:

“My mother is one of the strongest women I know. She’s white, my dad was Black, and in the ’60s and early ’70s she was raising two little Black kids after my dad left and she was alone, a single mom. Parts of her family disowned her. The Black side of our family didn’t want anything to do with her. I watched her struggle, be strong, face adversity, persevere, never quit, keep going. I know that’s where I get my perseverance from.”

On playing physically demanding roles in “X-Men,” “John Wick” and now “Bruised”:

“Kicking, punching and pushing myself to my limits has always been a great, healthy release. Like men, women have a lot of pent-up anger and angst and sadness. I needed a healthy way to get this stuff out of my body. Sweating and working out is also fuel for me. And I’m addicted to those feel-good endorphins.”

On the beauty of aging:

“We’re all going to get older. Our skin is going to shrivel up and we’re going to look different. I refuse to become someone who just tries to hold onto a youthful face and not embrace what’s most important about being beautiful—how you live your life, how you give back to others, how you connect to people, how you strengthen your mind, body and soul and nourish yourself, how you give in a meaningful way of yourself. The most beautiful people have something radiating inside.”

# # #

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Lily Tomlin to Receive AARP The Magazine’s Movies for Grownups® Awards Career Achievement Honor

Lily Tomlin to Receive AARP The Magazine’s Movies for Grownups® Awards Career Achievement Honor

2021’s Best Movies and TV for Grownups to be Honored During the 20th Anniversary Special on March 18 from Great Performances on PBS

WASHINGTONAARP The Magazine announced today that Lily Tomlin will receive this year’s Movies for Grownups® Career Achievement Award. Tomlin — a critically acclaimed actress and comedian across TV, film and theater, and recipient of eight Emmy Awards®, two Tony Awards®, a Grammy Award®, among many others — will be honored at the 20th Anniversary Special of the annual Movies for Grownups® (MFG) Awards, broadcast on Friday, March 18, 2022, at 9 p.m. ET, by Great Performances on PBS.

“We are thrilled to honor Lily Tomlin, a trailblazer whose six-decade career as an actress, comedian, writer and advocate continues to break through boundaries today,” said AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins. “She’s an icon across mediums – as fresh, innovative, and influential today as when she revolutionized TV on Laugh-In in the ‘60s. In her current role on Grace and Frankie, in which she portrays issues of aging with respect, originality and hilarity, she continues to dismantle outdated stereotypes, demonstrating why she remains at the leading edge of pop culture.”

For two decades, AARP’s Movies for Grownups program has championed movies for grownups, by grownups, by advocating for the 50-plus audience, fighting industry ageism and encouraging films — and now TV shows — that resonate with older viewers.

Ms. Tomlin said, “I am honored to receive this award from AARP. There are so few grownups in the world. I am happy to be one. I feel I am not only a grownup, but I am mature for my age and that’s the truthhhhh!”

Tomlin will receive Movies for Grownups’ highest honor at the virtual awards ceremony, which will also include recognition for 2021’s best films and television series, including best actor, best actress, best director, best picture/best movie for grownups, best series, best TV movie/limited series, and more.

She joins a prestigious list of previous AARP Movies for Grownups Career Achievement honorees, including George Clooney, Annette Bening, Kevin Costner, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, Shirley MacLaine, Helen Mirren, Robert Redford, Susan Sarandon and Sharon Stone.

Lily Tomlin, one of America’s foremost actresses, has conquered a wide range of media, starring in television, theater, motion pictures, animation, video and social media. Throughout her extraordinary career, Tomlin has received numerous awards, including: eight Emmys, with 25 Primetime and five Daytime nominations over 50 years; a Tony for her one-woman Broadway show, Appearing Nitely; a second Tony for best actress, a Drama Desk Award and an Outer Critics Circle Award for her one-woman performance in Jane Wagner’s The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe; a CableACE Award for executive producing the film adaptation of The Search; a Grammy for her comedy album, This is a Recording, and nominations for her albums Modern Scream, And That’s the Truth,  and On Stage; and two Peabody Awards, for Edith Ann’s Christmas (Just Say Noël), and The Celluloid Closet. She earned a 1976 Oscar nomination for Nashville, plus the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in 2003. In 2014, she received the Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, DC., followed by a SAG Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. 

Tomlin is critically acclaimed for her work across television (The West Wing, Malibu Country, Grace and Frankie, Web Therapy), stage (Appearing Nitely, The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, The Search), as well as film (Nashville, 9 to 5, The Incredible Shrinking Woman, Big Business, Shadows and Fog, Short Cuts, The Beverly Hillbillies, The Kid, The Walker, Pink Panther II, Admission, Grandma, among others).

Upcoming, Tomlin will star alongside her Grace and Frankie and 9 to 5 co-star Jane Fonda in Moving On. Reuniting with her Grandma and Admission director, Paul Weitz, Tomlin and Fonda play two old friends who reconnect at a funeral and decide to get revenge on the widower who wronged them decades before.

Tomlin is well-known for supporting philanthropic organizations, particularly those focused on animal welfare, civil rights, health care, protection of elephants, women’s issues, AIDS-related organizations, environmental concerns, overcoming homelessness and supporting the LGBTQ community in all aspects of life.

The virtual ceremony will be hosted by Alan Cumming and will be broadcast by Great Performances on Friday, March 18, 2022, at 9 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings), pbs.org/moviesforgrownups, and the PBS Video app as part of #PBSForTheArts, a multiplatform campaign that celebrates the arts in America.

# # # 

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

About The WNET Group

The WNET Group creates inspiring media content and meaningful experiences for diverse audiences nationwide. It is the community-supported home of New York’s THIRTEEN – America’s flagship PBS station – WLIW21, THIRTEEN PBSKids, WLIW World and Create; NJ PBS, New Jersey’s statewide public television network; Long Island’s only NPR station WLIW-FM; ALL ARTS, the arts and culture media provider; and newsroom NJ Spotlight News. Through these channels and streaming platforms, The WNET Group brings arts, culture, education, news, documentary, entertainment and DIY programming to more than five million viewers each month. The WNET Group’s award-winning productions include signature PBS series Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend and Amanpour and Company and trusted local news programs MetroFocus and NJ Spotlight News with Briana Vannozzi. Inspiring curiosity and nurturing dreams, The WNET Group’s award-winning Kids’ Media and Education team produces the PBS KIDS series Cyberchase, interactive Mission US history games, and resources for families, teachers and caregivers. A leading nonprofit public media producer for nearly 60 years, The WNET Group presents and distributes content that fosters lifelong learning, including multiplatform initiatives addressing poverty, jobs, economic opportunity, social justice, understanding and the environment. Through Passport, station members can stream new and archival programming anytime, anywhere. The WNET Group represents the best in public media. Join us.

For further information: Paola Groom, AARP Movies for Grownups®, 202-434-2555, pgroom@aarp.org; Justin Solar, R&C PMK, justin.solar@rogersandcowanpmk.com

AARP The Magazine Announces Nominees for the Annual Movies for Grownups® Awards

2021’s Best Movies and TV for Grownups to be Honored During the 20th Anniversary Special on March 18 from Great Performances on PBS

WASHINGTONAARP The Magazine today announced the nominees for the upcoming annual Movies for Grownups® Awards, with Belfast, King Richard, The Power of the Dog, West Side Story, and Being the Ricardos contending for Best Picture/Best Movie for Grownups category. For two decades, AARP’s Movies for Grownups program has championed movies for grownups, by grownups, by advocating for the 50-plus audience, fighting industry ageism and encouraging films that resonate with older viewers.

“During the pandemic, movies have been a source of entertainment, comfort, connection, and reflection for grownup audiences. TV and streaming have played those roles too, so we’re excited to continue with our expanded categories,” said Tim Appelo, AARP film and TV critic. “Every year, we spotlight films and shows that feature crucial issues, thoughtful storylines and the most talented grownup filmmakers that speak directly to a powerful 50-plus audience. Today’s nominations are another bumper year of masterworks – so many more than we had 20 years ago when Movies for Grownups started.”

Iconic and beloved screen and stage performer Alan Cumming will host the star-studded virtual special that will be broadcast by Great Performances on Friday, March 18, 2022, at 9 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings), pbs.org/moviesforgrownups, and the PBS Video app as part of #PBSForTheArts, a multiplatform campaign that celebrates the arts in America.

In the Best Actress category, nominees are Nicole Kidman (Being the Ricardos), Frances McDormand (The Tragedy of Macbeth), Halle Berry (Bruised), Sandra Bullock (The Unforgivable) and Helen Mirren (The Duke). In the Best Actor category, Will Smith (King Richard), Denzel Washington (The Tragedy of Macbeth), Javier Bardem (Being the Ricardos), Peter Dinklage (Cyrano) and Jim Broadbent (The Duke).

The nominees for Best Supporting Actress are Judi Dench (Belfast), Marlee Matlin (CODA), Aunjanue Ellis (King Richard), Cate Blanchett (Nightmare Alley) and Rita Moreno (West Side Story). In the Best Supporting Actor category, J.K. Simmons (Being the Ricardos), Ciarán Hinds (Belfast), Jared Leto (House of Gucci), Timothy Spall (Spencer) and David Strathairn (Nightmare Alley).

2021 Movies for Grownups® nominees for Best Director are Kenneth Branagh (Belfast), Jane Campion (The Power of the Dog), Guillermo del Toro (Nightmare Alley), Denis Villeneuve (Dune) and Steven Spielberg (West Side Story).

The nominees for Best TV Series are Hacks, Ted Lasso, The Chair, The Crown, and Succession.

In the Best TV Movie/Limited Series category, nominations go to Mare of Easttown, Halston, The Underground Railroad, MAID, and Nine Perfect Strangers.

The 2021 Television/Streaming nominees for Best Actress are Jean Smart (Hacks), Gillian Anderson (The Crown), Sandra Oh (The Chair), Lily Tomlin (Grace and Frankie) and Andie MacDowell (MAID). In the Best Actor category, Michael Keaton (Dopesick), Kevin Costner (Yellowstone), Ewan McGregor (Halston), Billy Porter (Pose) and Martin Short (Only Murders in the Building).

The complete list of the annual Movies for Grownups® Awards Nominees:

  • Best Picture/Best Movie for Grownups: Belfast, King Richard, The Power of the Dog, West Side Story, and Being the Ricardos
  • Best Actress: Nicole Kidman (Being the Ricardos), Frances McDormand (The Tragedy of Macbeth), Halle Berry (Bruised), Sandra Bullock (The Unforgivable), Helen Mirren (The Duke)
  • Best Actor: Will Smith (King Richard), Denzel Washington (The Tragedy of Macbeth), Javier Bardem (Being the Ricardos), Peter Dinklage (Cyrano), Jim Broadbent (The Duke)
  • Best Supporting Actress: Judi Dench (Belfast), Marlee Matlin (CODA), Aunjanue Ellis (King Richard), Cate Blanchett (Nightmare Alley) and Rita Moreno (West Side Story)
  • Best Supporting Actor: J.K. Simmons (Being the Ricardos), Ciarán Hinds (Belfast), Jared Leto (House of Gucci), Timothy Spall (Spencer), David Strathairn (Nightmare Alley)
  • Best Director: Kenneth Branagh (Belfast), Jane Campion (The Power of the Dog), Guillermo del Toro (Nightmare Alley), Denis Villeneuve (Dune) and Steven Spielberg (West Side Story)
  • Best Screenwriter: Jane Campion (The Power of the Dog), Kenneth Branagh (Belfast), Guillermo del Toro/Kim Morgan (Nightmare Alley), Paul Thomas Anderson (Licorice Pizza), Tony Kushner (West Side Story)
  • Best Actress (TV/Streaming): Jean Smart (Hacks), Gillian Anderson (The Crown), Sandra Oh (The Chair), Lily Tomlin (Grace and Frankie), Andie MacDowell (MAID
  • Best Actor (TV/Streaming): Michael Keaton (Dopesick), Kevin Costner (Yellowstone), Ewan McGregor (Halston), Billy Porter (Pose), Martin Short (Only Murders in the Building)
  • Best TV Series: Hacks, Ted Lasso, The Chair, The Crown, Succession
  • Best TV Movie/Limited Series: Mare of Easttown, Halston, The Underground Railroad, MAID, Nine Perfect Strangers 
  • Best Ensemble: The Harder They Fall, Nightmare Alley, Don’t Look Up, House of Gucci, West Side Story
  • Best IntergenerationalC’mon, C’mon, Belfast, The Tender Bar, King Richard, CODA
  • Best Buddy PictureQueen Bees, Off the Rails, 12 Mighty Orphans, Finch, The Harder They Fall
  • Best Time CapsuleSpencer, Licorice Pizza, Belfast, Being the Ricardos, West Side Story
  • Best Grownup Love Story: 23 Walks, Belfast, The Duke, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Cyrano
  • Best Documentary: Julia, Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised), My Name is Pauli Murray, The Beatles: Get Back, Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America
  • Best Foreign Film or Best International Film: Sheep Without A Shepherd (China), There Is No Evil (Iran/Germany), Hand of God (Italy), Drive My Car (Japan), Two of Us (France)

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

About The WNET Group

The WNET Group creates inspiring media content and meaningful experiences for diverse audiences nationwide. It is the community-supported home of New York’s THIRTEEN – America’s flagship PBS station – WLIW21, THIRTEEN PBSKids, WLIW World and Create; NJ PBS, New Jersey’s statewide public television network; Long Island’s only NPR station WLIW-FM; ALL ARTS, the arts and culture media provider; and newsroom NJ Spotlight News. Through these channels and streaming platforms, The WNET Group brings arts, culture, education, news, documentary, entertainment and DIY programming to more than five million viewers each month. The WNET Group’s award-winning productions include signature PBS series Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend and Amanpour and Company and trusted local news programs MetroFocus and NJ Spotlight News with Briana Vannozzi. Inspiring curiosity and nurturing dreams, The WNET Group’s award-winning Kids’ Media and Education team produces the PBS KIDS series Cyberchase, interactive Mission US history games, and resources for families, teachers and caregivers. A leading nonprofit public media producer for nearly 60 years, The WNET Group presents and distributes content that fosters lifelong learning, including multiplatform initiatives addressing poverty, jobs, economic opportunity, social justice, understanding and the environment. Through Passport, station members can stream new and archival programming anytime, anywhere. The WNET Group represents the best in public media. Join us.

For further information: Paola Groom, AARP Movies for Grownups®, 202-434-2555, pgroom@aarp.org; Marian Koltai-Levine, R&CPMK, marian.koltai@rogersandcowanpmk.com

AARP Bulletin’s 2022 Guide to COVID Variants, Vaccines and Masks

Top Health Experts Answer Pressing Questions About How to Make the New Year Healthy, Safe and Productive in the Jan/Feb Issue

WASHINGTON—With the two-year anniversary of COVID approaching, AARP Bulletin reports heartening news: There is a clear path forward for older adults. Despite the widespread prevalence of the omicron variant and a short-term surge in COVID cases, scientists agree that getting vaccinated and wearing masks will continue to greatly improve health outcomes and hasten the return to more normal times.

But the mistakes that public health experts made in the early stages of the pandemic – like asking people to not wear masks – along with the chaos brought on by the virus variants, have interfered with our public health progress.

This month, the Bulletin is taking a solid look at where the science stands: the triumphs, the missteps, and the future of COVID research.

From the mysteries surrounding long COVID to updates about the new COVID pill treatments, our editors have gathered intelligence from dozens of health experts who can answer readers’ most pressing pandemic questions.

Read in this month’s cover story:

  • How to fight pandemic confusion and debunk pandemic myths
  • The future of mask wearing
  • A guide to all vaccines (not just coronavirus) recommended for people 50 and older
  • And much more.

Also in the January issue:

Your Health

  • Turning the sound back on: For those with hearing loss so severe that even hearing aids don’t improve communication, cochlear implants might be a life-changer. Read the inspirational story of how an outspoken retired journalist reclaimed her quality of life thanks to a technological miracle that can recreate the electrical signals that your brain interprets as sound, letting you hear fully, once again.

Your Money

  • A new way to pay: Layaway with a twist! Many retailers are now offering a “buy now, pay later” (BNPL) option. About 45 million Americans utilized a BNPL service in 2021. They’re convenient for those who don’t have cash in pocket, but these programs can tempt consumers into overspending. Read this month’s Live Well for Less column to learn how to spend responsibly with a “buy now, pay later” program.
  • How to buy an index fund: For years, money experts have told Americans to skip stock-picking and put their long-term investments in index funds – mutual funds that buy shares in all the stocks or bonds included in the most popular market indexes. Trouble is, there are now countless index funds, some of them dubious. How to choose? This month’s issue will teach you about the range of index funds, how to filter them for safety and performance, ways to minimize fees, and be tax-smart with your index fund selections.

Fraud Watch

  • World ending? Nope. Just a scam: The economy is failing! Global instability endangers our planet! The pandemic threatens our way of living! Scam artists increasingly use topical scare tactics like these to prey on the concerns of senior citizens. Experts advise readers on ways to avoid emotion-based scams in this month’s issue.

Your Life

  • Q&A with Mel Brooks: When did he first realize he was funny? Why did he change his name to Brooks? What did being a teenage drummer teach him about comedy? The renowned Brooklyn-born comedian and author Mel Brooks lets readers inside of his life in this month’s issue of The Bulletin.

###

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Make your next Medicare premium payment online

Spend less time paying your bills—pay your Medicare Part B premium online.

If you get this bill from Medicare for your premiums, you may be able to pay it online with a credit or debit card.

Making your Medicare premium payment online is:

  • Secure—your information is protected
  • Quick—your payments process in about 5 business days (faster than regular mail)
  • Free—we never charge a fee to make a Medicare premium payment

Pay your premium online in 3 easy steps:

  1. Log in to your secure Medicare account (or create one if you don’t have an account yet).
  2. Select “Pay my premium.”
  3. Enter the amount you want to pay. Then, we’ll send you to the U.S. Treasury’s secure Pay.gov site to complete your payment.

Using your secure Medicare account gives you information about your Medicare premium bill and Medicare premium payment history. You’ll also get a confirmation number when you make your online Medicare premium payment—that’s peace of mind.

Sign up for Medicare Easy Pay through your online Medicare account

Instead of making one-time payments, you can sign up for Medicare Easy Pay to set up recurring premium payments that Medicare will automatically deduct from your checking or savings account each month.

Select “My Premiums” from the top menu, and then “Sign up” to fill out a short online form. It can take up to 6-8 weeks before your automatic deductions start. Once Medicare Easy Pay starts, you’ll see your automatic payments in your online payment history, and we’ll mail you monthly statements instead of a bill from Medicare.

With the ease of Medicare Easy Pay, you’ll have one less thing to remember.

Find all the ways to pay your Medicare premiums online.

Act fast! Review your Medicare plan by December 7.

Medicare Open Enrollment is almost over. If you’re thinking about changing your Medicare plan, you have until December 7 to take these actions:

  • Change how you get your Medicare coverage—Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan
  • Switch Medicare Advantage Plans (with or without drug coverage)
  • Join, switch, or drop a Medicare drug plan

Even if you’re happy with your current health coverage, it’s important to know your Medicare coverage options and compare other health and drug plans during Open Enrollment. You may find Medicare coverage that better meets your needs for the upcoming year.

Compare Medicare health & drug plans for 2022

Not all Medicare coverage options offer the same benefits, and costs can change each year. There may be other health and prescription drug plans available to you for 2022. 

Compare Medicare coverage options and find 2022 health and drug plans by December 7. If you like your current health care coverage and it’s still available in 2022, you don’t need to take any action.

Need help with your Medicare choices? Talk to someone.

Find 2022 Plans Now

It’s time to shop & compare plans for 2022

Medicare’s Open Enrollment is now – December 7. Review your Medicare health and drug coverage and compare it with other plans that may better meet your needs.

During Open Enrollment, you can make these changes for your 2022 coverage:

  • Change how you get your Medicare coverage—Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan
  • Switch Medicare Advantage Plans (with or without drug coverage)
  • Join, switch, or drop a Medicare drug plan

Review your options

Even if you’re happy with your current Medicare coverage, it’s important to review your coverage options for 2022. Here are a few reasons why:

  1. Your needs may change. You may find you’re going to the doctor more or less often, the prescription drugs you take may be different, or you may need better access to health care services.
  2. Benefits and costs can vary. Not all Medicare coverage options offer the same benefits. Plan benefits and costs can change from year-to-year. If you have a Medicare plan, check your Annual Notice of Changes (ANOC) to see what’s different for 2022.
  3. New, more affordable Medicare plans may be available. The total cost, provider network, and services offered are different between plans. Check if other plan options could better meet your needs or lower your out-of-pocket costs.

If you like your current health care coverage and it’s still available in 2022, you don’t need to take any action.

Shop & compare plans in your area

Compare 2022 coverage options and shop for plans. Get estimates of costs and review benefits offered by Medicare health and drug plans in your area. You can even compare plans based on their star rating for quality and performance.

If you log into (or create) your secure Medicare account, you can:

  • Save your current prescriptions and favorite pharmacies.
  • Get cost estimates for each plan based on the drugs you take and pharmacies you use.
  • See your costs if you get Extra Help with prescription costs.

Find & Compare 2022 Plans