Diabetic & Dental Benefits – CDC Advice

Medicare Dental

If you’re diabetic, the CDC recommends that you get a dental exam once a year or more often if your dentist says you need it. At your exam, your dentist or dental hygienist can:

  • Explain how diabetes affects your teeth and gums and check for problems, like cavities or gum disease.
  • Treat any problems you have with your teeth or gums.
  • Teach you how to check for signs of gum disease at home.
  • Provide care, like a fluoride treatment, to keep your mouth healthy.
  • Tell you how to treat problems, such as dry mouth.
  • Work with your dentist to create a health plan for your teeth.

    • Ask your dentist how to take care of your teeth at home and how often to come in for a dental visit.
    • Ask what to do if you start having problems with your teeth or gums.
    • Ask your dentist to send your exam results to your other doctors after every visit.
    • Be sure to keep your next dentist  appointment!


    Take care of your teeth at home.

    • Brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush two times a day or more.
    • Use toothpaste with fluoride and floss once a day.
    • Check your mouth for red or swollen gums, bleeding gums, loose teeth, a change in how your bite feels, or bad breath.
    • Visit a dentist if you think you have gum disease.
    • Limit food and drinks that are high in sugar.

If you need more Medicare Advantage dental benefits click the link to Chat Now about your Medicare Plan 👤 https://m.me/Medigaplife?ref=url-btn or call 1-855-800-5265. We may be able to help.

#medigaplife #medicare #medicareadvantage #disability #partd #vision #dental #diabetic #dentist #benefits

Coronavirus & Medicare

CMS Will Pay for COVID-19 Booster Shots, Eligible Consumers Can Receive at No Cost

Following the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recent action that authorized a booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for certain high-risk populations and a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will continue to provide coverage for this critical protection from the virus, including booster doses, without cost sharing.

Get ready! Medicare’s Open Enrollment starts October 15.

You can enroll in Medicare health and drug plans from October 15 – December 7. Get ready for Medicare’s Open Enrollment with these 5 tips:

  1. Check your mail. You may get important notices from Medicare or Social Security. If you’re in a Medicare plan, you’ll get an Annual Notice of Changes (ANOC) telling you of any changes in coverage, costs, or service area. Note any 2022 changes to your health coverage or any Extra Help you may get to pay for prescription drugs.

    You may also get brochures and other marketing materials from insurance companies that offer Medicare health and prescription drug plans. Remember — plans aren’t allowed to call or come to your home without an invitation from you. Find out how to protect yourself from Medicare fraud.

  2. Think about your Medicare coverage needs for 2022. Carefully review your current Medicare coverage, and note any upcoming changes to your costs or benefits. Decide if your current Medicare coverage will meet your needs for the year ahead. If you like your current coverage, and it’s still available for 2022, you don’t need to take any action to keep it.
  3. Review your 2022 “Medicare & You” handbookIt has information about Medicare coverage and Medicare plans in your area. If you want to get your handbook electronically, you can go paperless by logging into (or creating) your secure Medicare account.
  4. Preview 2022 health and prescription drug plans. We make it easy to compare coverage options and shop for health plans. For a personalized search, log in or create an account (if you have a Medicare Number) to create or access a list of your drugs, compare your current Medicare plan to others, and see prices based on any help you get with drug costs.
  5. Get personalized help in your community. You may be able to find free information and events online, or get help from health insurance counselors in your area by phone, like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program.

Visit Medicare.gov to sign up to get important news & updates by email from Medicare.

AARP The Magazine Celebrates Latin-American Icons in Special October/November Issue Featuring Salma Hayek, Carlos Santana, Johnny Pacheco and More

AARP The Magazine Celebrates Latin-American Icons in Special October/November Issue Featuring Salma Hayek, Carlos Santana, Johnny Pacheco and More

Plus: Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares a COVID Vaccine Update, Brooke Shields offers 6 Tips to Living Your Best Life, and Ricky Gervais Gets Personal

WASHINGTONTo mark Hispanic Heritage Month, the October/November issue of AARP The Magazine (ATM) highlights numerous influential Latin-American icons, including cover star Salma Hayek who shares a rare look into her life as a professional Latin-American woman in Hollywood. And in an exciting exclusive, AARP commissioned ten of the world’s most prominent Latino artists to create portraits of legendary Latino actors, artists, leaders, athletes, musicians and activists who have made a lasting global impact. To tell their unique stories, AARP turned to current luminaries such as Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos, Carolyne Roehm, and Bobby Valentin.

Also in this issue of AARP The Magazine: tips to brew a perfect cup of coffee, tales of unforgettable vacations, the year’s top medical breakthroughs, key steps to achieving online security, and more.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Salma Hayek
AARP The Magazine sat down with October/November cover star Salma Hayek to discuss her inspiring journey, advocacy and career in Hollywood. The 55-year-old Latin-American multi-hyphenate opens up about her latest projects, behind and in front of the screen, and the importance of portraying female experiences such as menopause as authentically as possible.

Latin-American Icons

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine is spotlighting influential Latin-American voices and amplifying their contributions to the community. Video conversations with Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos and Bobby Valentín and more are available online at AARP.org/HispanicHeritage as a part of the special October/November Issue.

5 Steps to Online Security

Did you know a single computer file surfaced on the Internet this past summer that contained 8.4 billion stolen passwords? To help you protect against the increasing possibility that thieves already have your password information, AARP’s resident fraud expert Doug Shadel has put together a specific five-point plan for updating and securing all your digital passwords in ways that best thwart the bad guys.

Brooke Shields

Actress, model and mother Brooke Shields emphasizes the importance of positive body image and reveals her six tips to live your best life. Shields reveals how finding quiet, staying grounded, learning to love her body, and pivoting into every new life chapter has shaped her at age 56. She returns to the screen this November with “A Castle for Christmas” (Netflix).

Ricky Gervais

Known best for making audiences both laugh and blush around the world, British comedian Ricky Gervais has made a household name for himself by having few barriers. In an exclusive conversation with ATM, Gervais discusses how his life experiences gave him the building blocks for his thriving career in entertainment, why political affiliations should stay out of comedy, and where he is now at 60-years-old. His Netflix show “After Life,” which he created, directed, wrote and stars in, returned for its third and final season in 2022.

Medical Breakthroughs

In an exclusive adaptation from his new book, Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells the behind-the-scenes story of how a Covid vaccine emerged just one year after the virus emerged. Plus our annual roundup of new medical procedures, tests, technology and drugs that are changing the face of disease in America and around the world.

The Man Who Brings Back The Dead

Amateur artist Carl Koppelman has developed a national reputation among detectives, medical examiners and fellow sleuths for his unique ability to to create realistic portraits of people, using only their remains for guidance. In so doing, he has help investigators solve over a dozen “missing persons” cases. In this extraordinary long-read tale, you’ll meet a fascinating cast of characters, learn of missing-person cases that have bedeviled police for decades, and discover an undergound world of amateur detectives determined to help solve these cases. And you’ll also meet a man who only found his cause later in life as a caregiver to his mom, tapping into artistic skills that lay dormant for decades.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The Magazine

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The Magazine

How She Approaches Aging, Navigates Hollywood, and More in the October/November Issue

LOS ANGELESIn celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine sat down with October/November cover star Salma Hayek to discuss her inspiring journey, advocacy and career in Hollywood. In a wide-ranging interview, the 55-year-old Latin-American multi-hyphenate details her latest projects, both behind and in front of the screen, and the importance of portraying female experiences such as menopause as authentically as possible.

After surviving a near-death COVID-19 scare, Hayek has returned to the screen with numerous projects including “Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” “Eternals,” and the upcoming “House of Gucci.” She continues to pursue women-driven narratives with her company, Ventanarosa, as well as undertaking additional humanitarian and advocacy initiatives. A devoted mother, Hayek is also working to instill her desire to help others in her own children.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s October/November 2021 cover story featuring Salma Hayek. The issue is available in homes starting in October and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On being a humanist:

“I am a feminist, but that’s not why I work with women. I work with them because I’m a humanist. And if men were the ones who were not given the same human rights, I’d be fighting for them.”

On diversity in the industry:

“‘We’ve got the Latino box checked; we’ve got the African American box checked.’ It’s an acknowledgment that these voices are important, and that I applaud. But I wish we could find a space where people feel, My voice also has to do with you, and your voice also has to do with me.”

On authentic portrayal of the experience of menopause:

“When I was going through menopause myself, I wondered, How come nobody talks about this in the movies?

On her experience with COVID-19:

“I realized that we are so fragile—not just as individuals but collectively. I was thinking more about the global experience than about my own personal mortality, because this is what a pandemic forces you to do.”

On learning how to find the right opportunities and being grateful for every experience:

“I learned every single day from every single person on the crew … even the bad movies gave me so much. They also gave me the humbleness to say, ‘OK, it’s not going to advance my career. But thank you for allowing me to pay my rent.’”

# # #

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The Magazine

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The Magazine

How She Approaches Aging, Navigates Hollywood, and More in the October/November Issue

LOS ANGELESIn celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine sat down with October/November cover star Salma Hayek to discuss her inspiring journey, advocacy and career in Hollywood. In a wide-ranging interview, the 55-year-old Latin-American multi-hyphenate details her latest projects, both behind and in front of the screen, and the importance of portraying female experiences such as menopause as authentically as possible.

After surviving a near-death COVID-19 scare, Hayek has returned to the screen with numerous projects including “Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” “Eternals,” and the upcoming “House of Gucci.” She continues to pursue women-driven narratives with her company, Ventanarosa, as well as undertaking additional humanitarian and advocacy initiatives. A devoted mother, Hayek is also working to instill her desire to help others in her own children.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s October/November 2021 cover story featuring Salma Hayek. The issue is available in homes starting in October and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On being a humanist:

“I am a feminist, but that’s not why I work with women. I work with them because I’m a humanist. And if men were the ones who were not given the same human rights, I’d be fighting for them.”

On diversity in the industry:

“‘We’ve got the Latino box checked; we’ve got the African American box checked.’ It’s an acknowledgment that these voices are important, and that I applaud. But I wish we could find a space where people feel, My voice also has to do with you, and your voice also has to do with me.”

On authentic portrayal of the experience of menopause:

“When I was going through menopause myself, I wondered, How come nobody talks about this in the movies?

On her experience with COVID-19:

“I realized that we are so fragile—not just as individuals but collectively. I was thinking more about the global experience than about my own personal mortality, because this is what a pandemic forces you to do.”

On learning how to find the right opportunities and being grateful for every experience:

“I learned every single day from every single person on the crew … even the bad movies gave me so much. They also gave me the humbleness to say, ‘OK, it’s not going to advance my career. But thank you for allowing me to pay my rent.’”

# # #

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Medicare Part B

Social Security Expands Compassionate Allowances Program for the Disabled

Kilolo Kijakazi, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, announced 12 new Compassionate Allowances conditions for the Disabled

Stoke Awareness

Men and Stroke – Advice and Tips From the CDC

Stroke is a leading cause of death in men, killing almost the same number of men each year as prostate cancer and Alzheimer’s disease combined.1 Stroke is also a leading cause of long-term disability,2 and men under age 44 are hospitalized for ischemic stroke at a higher rate than women in the same age group.

AARP The Magazine Honors Latino American Icons in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

AARP The Magazine Honors Latino American Icons in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos, and More Pay Tribute to Important U.S. Latino Historical Figures In Special October/November Issue

En español | LOS ANGELESTo mark Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine (ATM) pays tribute to 10 iconic Latino Americans who have made lasting and important contributions to their community and country. ATM editors recruited legends such as Emmy Award–winning actor Edward James Olmos, rocker Carlos Santana and more to pay tribute to those who inspired them, including baseball legend Roberto Clemente, labor leader Dolores Huerta, actor Anthony Quinn, the legendary singer Selena, and others.

As part of the tribute, ATM commissioned many of today’s influential and popular artists and illustrators from across the Americas to create a portrait gallery of these great figures. The artwork is filled with the vibrancy and energy of this diverse community. In this issue, read about the influence and contributions of these Latino American icons to U.S. history and to today’s American culture.

Exclusive video conversations with Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos and Bobby Valentín about their Latino American icons are available on AARP.org/HispanicHeritage. Full-length stories and portrait gallery are also available.

The following is a sneak peek of the upcoming special Hispanic Heritage Month issue:

Dolores Huerta — Born in 1930  — American labor leader and human rights activist; cofounder, with Cesar Chavez, of United Farm Workers; New Mexico native 

BY CARLOS SANTANA, rock musician and activist.

WHEN YOU hear “Dolores Huerta,” you immediately think hope and courage. She has no fear of doing something no one has done before. In the 1960s and ’70s, she and Cesar Chavez demanded humane working conditions for farmworkers and the right for them to organize. Dolores used strikes and boycotts to face down agribusiness giants. Dolores’ mission is to establish equality, fairness and justice but also to help people believe in their own superpowers. The chant that she created—and that stays with everybody, including Barack Obama—is “Sí se puede!” Yes, it can be done! Will it to be so! She is able to ignite people to believe in their own self-worth. To achieve what Dolores has, you have to be strong, with tenacity of spirit. I want to put Dolores in the highest light so everyone in this world, especially women, can be empowered by her indomitable will. She’s unmatched in her energy, and she uses it to organize on behalf of women, Latinos and LGBTQIA people, and for better education and health for all. I have never met a person with more perseverance, combined with gentleness, class, and dignity. She’s a machete. And she’s a beam of light. —As told to Julia Lobaco 

# # #

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Guard your card: How to protect your Medicare card


Protect yourself by protecting your Medicare card!  

The next Medicare Open Enrollment Period (October 15 – December 7) is coming fast, which means con artists may try to steal your identity and commit Medicare fraud. Medicare has taken actions to make Medicare cards safer by replacing Social Security Numbers with more secure ID numbers. But even with those efforts, fraudsters may still try to take advantage of you during Open Enrollment. 

Medicare fraud results in higher health care costs for taxpayers just like you. That’s why it’s so important to know how to protect your Medicare card and Number.

What can you do to protect yourself and prevent Medicare fraud?

The most important thing you can do is guard your Medicare card like it’s a credit card. Don’t give your Medicare card or Number to anyone except your doctor or people you know should have it.

You can also:

  • Keep your Medicare Number to yourself. If you get a call from people promising you things if you give them your Medicare Number — don’t do it. This is a common Medicare scam.
  • Refuse any offer of money or gifts for free medical care. A common ploy of identity thieves is to say they can send you your free gift right away — they just need your Medicare Number.
  • Use a calendar to record all of your doctors’ appointments and any tests you get. When you check your Medicare statements, look out for any items and services listed and other details that don’t look correct. If you see a charge or service that you think is incorrect and you know the provider, call their office and ask about it.
  • Learn how a Medicare plan works before you join.
  • Stay alert for fraud during the coronavirus disease 2019 (or COVID-19) national emergency. Con artists like to take advantage of people when they’re distracted.

Committing Medicare fraud is illegal & you should report it

If you suspect fraud, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users can call 1-877-486-2048. If you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan or Medicare drug plan, call the Medicare Drug Integrity Contractor (MEDIC) at 1-877-7SAFERX (1-877-772-3379).

Learn how to protect yourself from health care fraud. Visit Medicare.gov/fraud for more information on how to help fight Medicare fraud.