Prevent Medicare fraud — become an informed Medicare consumer


Each day, you make important choices about your finances, health, privacy, and more. It’s National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW), a time that non-profit organizations and government agencies can help you protect yourself and prevent fraud by taking advantage of your rights and making better, more informed choices.

Here are some things you can do to prevent Medicare fraud and become an informed Medicare consumer:

  • Know your rights: As a person with Medicare, you have certain rights and protections to help protect you and make sure you get the health care services the law says you can get.
  • Protect your identity: Identity theft happens when someone uses your personal information without your consent to commit fraud or other crimes. Keep information like your Social Security Number, bank account numbers, and Medicare Number safe. Get more information on how to protect yourself from identity theft.
  • Help fight Medicare fraud: Medicare fraud takes money from the Medicare program each year, which means higher health care costs for you. Learn how to report Medicare fraud.
  • Join the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP): The SMP educates and empowers people with Medicare to take an active role in detecting and preventing health care fraud and abuse.
  • Make informed Medicare choices: Each year during the fall Open Enrollment Period (October 15–December 7), review your plan to make sure it will meet your needs for the next year. If you’re not satisfied with your current plan, you can switch during the Open Enrollment Period with the Medicare Plan Finder.

Visit the Federal Trade Commission’s NCPW page to learn more about the campaign, see which agencies and organizations are able to help you, and to find out if there are any activities happening in your area.

Insider Secrets from AARP Bulletin! How to Get Around Today’s Shortage of Workers and Supplies to Get the Work You Need Done

Insider Secrets from AARP Bulletin! How to Get Around Today’s Shortage of Workers and Supplies to Get the Work You Need Done

Also in the May issue: An Investigative Report on America’s Long-Term Care Crisis: The Unfair Plight of 50+ Million Unpaid Caregivers – and How to Fix It

WASHINGTONNeed work done on your house, or an elective surgery done, or a will written, or a major car fix? Good luck getting it done soon! A unique economic moment in America (surging prices, too few workers, and a shortage of products and materials) makes getting many common needs completed harder than in any time in recent years. But there are ways to succeed. AARP Bulletin reporters spoke to dozens of industry insiders to find out the best way to get top-grade help fast in 12 categories, from home repair to money help to a new doctor. Here are the ways to separate a good home handyman from a great one; how to jump the line in securing a contractor; how to choose the right hospital, post pandemic; and more. It’s all part of “Beat the System: Experts Edition,” the Bulletin’s second guide of the past year for getting the best possible service and value in these changing economic times.

PLUS: Long-Term Care Is the Crisis Everyone Must Face: Almost a year in the making, this investigative report reveals just how difficult it can be to be a family caregiver. The report uncovers why government agencies, employers, even the healthcare system fail to provide adequate caregiving support, and the implications it has on both those receiving and those giving care. It’s a crucial topic: The vast majority of Americans will someday need caregiving help.

The special report details the five primary “breaks” in America’s long-term care system, and how dozens of experts would go about fixing them. It also details a revolution in home-care medical technology that could transform both caregiving and healthcare – once insurers and Medicare embrace them. Also included:

  • A poignant oral history of the lives of dozens of caregivers, including caregiving expert Amy Goyer, offering a glimpse into their struggles as well as their loving devotion;
  • AARP’s Caregiving Starter Guide, which offers five steps to help readers prepare for their new caregiving roles;
  • And much more.

Also in the May issue:

Fraud Watch

  • Enjoy Hobbies? Watch for Fraud!: The art of fraud today is customizing pitches to the person, and one of the top ways that’s happening is by focusing on hobbies and interests. Learn how scammers are specifically pitching collectors, enthusiasts, crafters, sports lovers and more with frauds specific to their targets’ passions.

Your Money

  • Credit Card Tricks to Master: Make fees disappear! Get more money back! Make paying even faster! Today’s credit cards are not only loaded with greater technology to make them easier and more secure to use, but also come with more incentives to use. Here’s how to get the most value out of a credit card today. Plus…
  • Face-off! Credit vs. Debit Cards: Though they look alike and function similarly, there are crucial differences between credit and debit cards. Knowing which to use in certain situations can make all the difference when it comes to finances. In this month’s “Your Money,” learn how to get the best bang for your buck as credit and debit cards face off in seven everyday purchasing scenarios. 
  • Subscribe and Save?: “Automatic shipment” programs and other subscription services make getting the things you need easier, but at what cost? One survey found that most people spend over $50 per month on recurring monthly purchases. But do they deliver the best prices? Are you really using the service enough to warrant the ongoing costs? Read about the pros and cons of regular product deliveries from Live Well for Less columnist Lisa Lee Freeman to determine if a subscription service is right for you.

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About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol @AARPadvocates and @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Insider Secrets from AARP Bulletin! How to Get Around Today’s Shortage of Workers and Supplies to Get the Work You Need Done

Insider Secrets from AARP Bulletin! How to Get Around Today’s Shortage of Workers and Supplies to Get the Work You Need Done

Also in the May issue: An Investigative Report on America’s Long-Term Care Crisis: The Unfair Plight of 50+ Million Unpaid Caregivers – and How to Fix It

WASHINGTONNeed work done on your house, or an elective surgery done, or a will written, or a major car fix? Good luck getting it done soon! A unique economic moment in America (surging prices, too few workers, and a shortage of products and materials) makes getting many common needs completed harder than in any time in recent years. But there are ways to succeed. AARP Bulletin reporters spoke to dozens of industry insiders to find out the best way to get top-grade help fast in 12 categories, from home repair to money help to a new doctor. Here are the ways to separate a good home handyman from a great one; how to jump the line in securing a contractor; how to choose the right hospital, post pandemic; and more. It’s all part of “Beat the System: Experts Edition,” the Bulletin’s second guide of the past year for getting the best possible service and value in these changing economic times.

PLUS: Long-Term Care Is the Crisis Everyone Must Face: Almost a year in the making, this investigative report reveals just how difficult it can be to be a family caregiver. The report uncovers why government agencies, employers, even the healthcare system fail to provide adequate caregiving support, and the implications it has on both those receiving and those giving care. It’s a crucial topic: The vast majority of Americans will someday need caregiving help.

The special report details the five primary “breaks” in America’s long-term care system, and how dozens of experts would go about fixing them. It also details a revolution in home-care medical technology that could transform both caregiving and healthcare – once insurers and Medicare embrace them. Also included:

  • A poignant oral history of the lives of dozens of caregivers, including caregiving expert Amy Goyer, offering a glimpse into their struggles as well as their loving devotion;
  • AARP’s Caregiving Starter Guide, which offers five steps to help readers prepare for their new caregiving roles;
  • And much more.

Also in the May issue:

Fraud Watch

  • Enjoy Hobbies? Watch for Fraud!: The art of fraud today is customizing pitches to the person, and one of the top ways that’s happening is by focusing on hobbies and interests. Learn how scammers are specifically pitching collectors, enthusiasts, crafters, sports lovers and more with frauds specific to their targets’ passions.

Your Money

  • Credit Card Tricks to Master: Make fees disappear! Get more money back! Make paying even faster! Today’s credit cards are not only loaded with greater technology to make them easier and more secure to use, but also come with more incentives to use. Here’s how to get the most value out of a credit card today. Plus…
  • Face-off! Credit vs. Debit Cards: Though they look alike and function similarly, there are crucial differences between credit and debit cards. Knowing which to use in certain situations can make all the difference when it comes to finances. In this month’s “Your Money,” learn how to get the best bang for your buck as credit and debit cards face off in seven everyday purchasing scenarios. 
  • Subscribe and Save?: “Automatic shipment” programs and other subscription services make getting the things you need easier, but at what cost? One survey found that most people spend over $50 per month on recurring monthly purchases. But do they deliver the best prices? Are you really using the service enough to warrant the ongoing costs? Read about the pros and cons of regular product deliveries from Live Well for Less columnist Lisa Lee Freeman to determine if a subscription service is right for you.

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About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol @AARPadvocates and @AliadosAdelante on social media.

AARP The Magazine Features Liam Neeson on his Upcoming Lead Role in ‘Memory’, Selma Blair on Living her Best Life with MS, and Michael Strahan on his high-speed secret for relaxing

AARP The Magazine Features Liam Neeson on his Upcoming Lead Role in ‘Memory’, Selma Blair on Living her Best Life with MS, and Michael Strahan on his high-speed secret for relaxing

Plus: Jean Smart Talks Biggest Life Lessons Learned, A Guide to Staging the Perfect Mother’s Day Brunch, ‘and Our Annual Look at the Top Health Issues We Face in our 50s, 60s and 70s, and How to Overcome Each

WASHINGTON—This spring, the April/May 2022 issue of AARP The Magazine (ATM) offers readers insight into living their most fulfilling lives, despite what obstacles are thrown. Cover star Liam Neeson shares how memories still affect his decision-making process when taking on new roles. Renowned actress Selma Blair explains that asking for help is a strength not a weakness when discussing her life and future with Multiple Sclerosis.. Several fascinating experts (among them Lesley Stahl, Deepak Chopra and Michael Strahan) reveal their best American road trips. And actress Jean Smart talks heading into the future and what directions she hopes her career will (and won’t) take.

Plus, an exclusive survey on health, aging, and living a happier life; a fascinating quiz to determine how much of a cheapskate you are; and a guide through surviving long lasting financial dilemmas.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Liam Neeson

Neeson spent time with AARP The Magazine (ATM) to discuss his decision-making process when taking on roles including his lead in the upcoming action thriller, Memory. The actor also discussed the powerful women who have influenced him; how his youth in a war-torn country still affects him; the joys of fatherhood; and his sense of wonder at his success in the action-hero genre

The A List – Selma Blair

Actress Selma Blair discusses the seven things you should be doing now to live a more fulfilling life. Having been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2018, the actress is no stranger to the hardships that arise when you feel as though you are losing your own body and has words of wisdom for those traveling down similar paths.

Jean Smart

Emmy Award winning Actress Jean Smart dives into the life lessons she’s learned over the years of her career, her thoughts on going nude, and hope for future roles and co-stars to work with.

A Road Trip for Everyone

Let’s go on a trip! Well known travelers have put together itineraries for specific interests, from a car enthusiast’s outing (your guide: Michael Strahan) to a spiritual journey (Deepak Chopra) to a biker’s odyssey (environmentalist and author Bill McKibben).

Are you a penny pincher?

With just seven fascinating “multiple choice” questions, our quiz reveals not just your unique frugality personality, but insights into whether you are going too far – or not far enough – in being a smart spender. And in these times of crazy inflation, who doesn’t want to know that?

Health Report

Based on AARP’s exclusive survey on health and aging, the “You Asked, We Answered” guide explores diets, prescriptions, fitness, as well as physical and mental health with the aim of answering the unique questions older Americans have in relation to their health and overall happiness.

Your Next Big Work Decision

The first of a four-part series guide through common and challenging dilemmas that can have a lasting impact on your financial and overall well-being. Topics include job relocation, age discrimination at work, and the option of freelancing over a company commitment.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

Action Hero Liam Neeson Shows His Compassionate Side in AARP The Magazine

LOS ANGELESLiam Neeson is still making action movies at 69, but behind his fearsome figure lies a philosophical, playful and witty soul. He sat down with AARP The Magazine (ATM) to discuss his decision-making process when taking on roles, including his lead in the upcoming action thriller, Memory. The Irish American actor also discussed the powerful women who have influenced him; how his youth in a war-torn country still affects him; the joys of fatherhood; and his sense of wonder at his success in the action-hero genre and how the stunts and scripts haven’t seemed to catch up with him – not that he minds.  

The following are excerpts from ATM’s April/May 2022 cover story featuring Liam Neeson. The issue is available in homes starting in April and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/. 

On stunts in his seventies: 

The stunts I leave to the stuntman. The fighting I do myself, and I keep reasonably fit for that…. They’re still sending me action scripts, you know? They wanted me to do one with Jackie Chan, which when I read it, I thought, well this would be tough for a 22-year-old, let alone a 69-year-old who’s going to be 70 this year. That’s the only one I turned down.” 

On his upcoming film Memory: 

My elder sister, she has a very close pal who is suffering from dementia, and he cannot remember stuff from 5, 10, 15 minutes ago. So, in Memory I work in little bits of stammering or clumsiness that grabs people in the audience who know someone who’s suffering from it, from dementia or Alzheimer’s, but I wanted to keep it very, very subtle, because it could become jokey if I overdid the dementia.” 

On receiving parenting wisdom from Meryl Streep: 

“As a parent, you’re always thinking, They should’ve been back 10 minutes ago—what’s happened? My dear friend Meryl Streep came up to visit Natasha, my late wife, and myself when Micheál was 6 months old. He was lying on his cot, asleep, arms above his head, and she said, “That’s good. He’s not curled up. He’s comfortable and feels at home.” And I said, “Thank you, Meryl. That’s very sweet.” And then, as we were heading down the stairs, she added, “You both realize you’re hostages for the rest of your life, right?” [Laughs.] And she was absolutely correct.” 

On watching his kids grow up: 

Sometimes you see in your kids a flash of their mother or a flash of your grandmom, and it might last only seconds, but you see the connection.” 

On how his upbringing in Ireland may have shaped his roles: 

I’m talking 50 years ago. It’s kind of a post-traumatic stress disorder. I don’t know if it has scarred me, but it has definitely formed something of my character. Maybe you’re right—maybe even when I play these violent roles, I’m trying to bring some quality of redemption or justice.” 

On balancing violence and love in boxing: 

“There was respect, especially after a fight. You’d go and hug your opponent, and he’d hug you. Yes, you’re trying to punch each other’s head off with gloves, but there’s something else, too, dare I say it: the word “love,” ya know?” 

On relaxing in his garden in upstate New York: 

I have a few acres upstate with a walled garden where we grow vegetables. I have three apple trees…Long ago we tried chickens, and they stopped laying. Someone suggested getting a cock so I got this little cock, and when I went in to check on the hens, this cock would fly in my face. Every f—— morning. And I thought, I’m going to kill this f—–. I told Natasha, I said, “Darlin’, we can’t do this. This cock is putting the fear of God in me.” We gave away the chickens.” 

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP@AARPenEspanol @AARPadvocates and @AliadosAdelante on social media.

AARP Bulletin Investigation Reveals Inner Workings of International Scam Networks

AARP Bulletin Investigation Reveals Inner Workings of International Scam Networks

Exclusive report details how boiler rooms, money launderers, cybercriminals operate

WASHINGTON—With fraudulent phone calls, emails, social media posts and texts arriving most every day to most every U.S. adult, Americans fear being victimized by cybercrimes much more than by traditional crimes. In response, AARP sent out a team of journalists and fraud fighters to detail the extent of the multi-billion-dollar fraud industry and exactly how it operates. Among its findings, which appear in the April issue of the AARP Bulletin:

  • Organized crime enterprises, both domestic and international, have learned how easy and profitable consumer fraud can be – particularly in comparison with their other illicit operations – and are eagerly setting up boiler rooms and other fraud operations.
  • An open market for illegally obtained personal information continues to flourish on the “dark web,” where credit card numbers, Social Security numbers and other private data can be bought for a few dollars each.
  • The software and systems needed to set up illegal boiler rooms or cyberfraud operations are cheap, sophisticated, yet easily acquired and mastered.
  • Money laundering operations to “wash” payments from victims so they are untraceable are now able to convert a gift card into merchandise to be sold overseas within minutes.

For all the worrisome details of the scope and capability of the fraud industry, protecting yourself from becoming a victim has also become easier. The AARP Bulletin report exhaustively details both the tools, tips and techniques consumers can use to help never lose a cent to fraud, and also reveals the hottest new scams now rolling out across America.

Also in the April issue:

In the News

  • Special Report: Elections 2022: This year’s midterm election is of unusually high importance, as over 30 governor races, countless local races and initiatives, new voting laws and the fate of Congress weigh on the minds of voters. In this special report, AARP Bulletin breaks down what is at stake and how to vote in your state safely.

Your Money

  • Windfall Wizard: Whether it’s a tax refund, inheritance, home sale or lucky day with the Lotto, most adults at some point get a one-time cash windfall. What should you do with it? If you choose incorrectly, our experts say you could lose out on a great opportunity. Read this month’s “Your Money” section to learn to learn the best ways to use (or save) newfound money.
  • Outlet Deals Inside Your Home: If you love shopping at outlet malls for great deals, you’ll really love online outlet stores that sell open-box, past season, overstock items, and sometimes exclusive labels. This month’s issue will help you find websites with bargains, teach you to be alert to differences, and how to seek out discount codes.
  • The Other Retirement Plan: The retirement plan for millions of American teachers, government employees and workers isn’t the 401(k) savings plan, but the 403(b) plan, which operate by a much different set of rules. And in some cases, they are much riskier than 401(k)s. Learn how they are different, the issues 403(b) plans face, and how to protect yours.

Your Life:

  • Test-Drive A New Community: “Try before you buy” is a good guide not only when making a purchase like a car, but also for when you are considering a new community to live in. Read four intriguing and revealing stories about how older Americans used work assignments, the Internet, vacations and telecommuting to identify their dream retirement locale.

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About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP@AARPenEspanol @AARPadvocates and @AliadosAdelante on social media.

March AARP Bulletin: Are your Social Security Benefits at Risk? The Truth about the Agency’s Health and What Can Be Done to Strengthen It

March AARP Bulletin: Are your Social Security Benefits at Risk? The Truth about the Agency’s Health and What Can Be Done to Strengthen It

WASHINGTONToday, the savings accounts from which Social Security draws funds to pay the 60-plus million people receiving benefits are worth almost $3 trillion. In 12 years, that number is projected to be zero, due in large part to a surge in the number of retirees not matched by the growth of jobs in America. If those Trust Funds get depleted as projected, Americans could face the first slash in promised benefits in the program’s history.

What exactly is going on? And more importantly, what can be done to shore up a program that is both beloved and essential to so many Americans?

The AARP Bulletin sent out a team of esteemed journalists to look at the health and future of Social Security from several angles and to detail what choices need to be made by Congress to guarantee full benefits to all who have earned them, in perpetuity. It’s work that must be done: Without Social Security, 21.7 million more Americans would be below the poverty line. Some 40 percent of retired Americans rely entirely on the monthly income it provides. And the program is nearly universally supported across the political spectrum.

But the steps needed to stabilize the program’s finances – some level of benefit cuts, revenue increases or both – are politically challenging. The Bulletin provides a comprehensive look at what those choices are and details the next steps likely to occur to take on the challenge.

Also learn in the cover story:

  • 6 crucial facts to know about Social Security that may help you get more value from it;
  • Why customer service is deteriorating at the agency, and what plans it has to improve;
  • 5 tips for calling SSA customer support and getting the help you need.  

Plus: When To Start Taking Social Security Benefits? Many financial professionals believe that you should wait until 70 to start receiving Social Security benefits. But there are compelling arguments for taking your retirement checks earlier. We asked two financial advisers to list the pros and cons of taking Social Security at 70 versus when you’ve reached full retirement age.

Also in the March issue:

Your Health

  • Gaining Weight as You Age Is Avoidable and Even Reversible: Extra protein, when eaten at the right time, could be an effective way to shed those extra pounds while preserving muscle. This month learn about AARP’s new book, ‘The Whole Body Reset,’ which discusses how protein timing can lead to better health and more energy.
  • Why Age and Alcohol Don’t Mix: Have you started drinking more during the pandemic? If so, you are not alone. During the pandemic, 14% of older adults reported increasing alcohol consumption, according to a national survey by University of Michigan researchers. Read this month’s issue to learn the effects of alcohol on your body as you age and when to limit your consumption.

Fraud Watch

  • Don’t Let FOMO Trip You Up: Do you have FOMO (fear of missing out)? The phenomenon is more than just a catch phrase – it can influence people to make hasty decisions that can make them more susceptible to scammers. Read this month’s “Fraud Watch” to learn tips for stopping scammers in their tracks.

Your Money

  • An Honest Guide to Digital Financial Tools: Whether it’s sending money to family, tipping, budgeting, or paying your bills: There’s an app for that. Every financial task you can imagine has been digitized. But is digital always better? In this month’s “Your Money,” we hear from financial professionals about the risks and benefits of the digital options for five common money activities.  
  • Good As New? When to Buy Refurbished: Inflation? Shortages? No problem! You may get what you want at prices you’ll love if you shop for refurbished items. Buying used or pre-owned can save you up to as much as 70% of the item’s market price. This month’s issue help you determine if buying used is something that you should start doing.

Your Life

  • Q&A with Good Morning America’s Robin Roberts: In this month’s Q&A, the familiar anchor and author of new book ‘Brighter by the Day’ details how she finds joy while facing a life-threatening disease. Robin discusses her childhood, her experience going public with her illness, and much more.

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About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Exclusively From AARP The Magazine: Halle Berry On How She Found Her Groove in Her 50s, Dolly Parton and James Patterson Team Up For A New Novel and Album, and More

Exclusively From AARP The Magazine: Halle Berry On How She Found Her Groove in Her 50s, Dolly Parton and James Patterson Team Up For A New Novel and Album, and More

Plus: John Mellencamp’s Tips For Living Your Best Life, Tools to a Successful Tax Season, and Secrets to a Big Vacation on a Little Budget

WASHINGTONIn the February/March issue of AARP The Magazine, cover star Halle Berry chats about her latest project and directorial debut film “Bruised,” rock hitmaker John Mellencamp shares a look at his retirement, “Hot In Cleveland” actress Valerie Bertinelli shares her most notable life lessons, and unexpected collaborators Dolly Parton and James Patterson talk about “Run, Rose, Run,” their new novel and accompanying soundtrack. 

Also, an insightful break down of the latest robocall scam, 10 important warning signs that you may have heart disease and an informative guide to visiting America’s biggest cities on a budget – all in the February/March 2022 issue of AARP The Magazine.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Halle Berry

Fresh off the heels of her latest film “Bruised,” ATM caught up with Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-winning actress Halle Berry, diving into her “life-changing” role and directorial debut. Globally known and celebrated for her captivating performances, the actress also shared an intimate look into her home life, opening up about how she has recently found balance and bliss as a parent, partner and professional. She looks ahead optimistically, touching on true connection, inner beauty, feminism, equality and diversity.

Valerie Bertinelli

The “Hot In Cleveland” actress breaks down the greatest lessons she has learned in her 6 decades, offering candid insight into her connection to food and culinary education from her late ex-husband’s mother, how she owns her regrets, why she doesn’t take things personally, the importance of feeling your feelings, and more.

John Mellencamp’s 7 Tips for Living Your Best Life

The 70-year-old rock star shares his secrets to productivity and problem-solving, meaningful friendships, and the importance of continuing to create something everyday.

Dolly Parton and James Patterson on forthcoming novel and soundtrack “Run, Rose, Run”

Thriller writer James Patterson and country music legend Dolly Parton chat with ATM about their unexpected collaboration, forthcoming novel and accompanying soundtrack “Run, Rose, Run,” which is said to be amongst the most creative book-writing partnerships out there. The novel hits stands March 7.

The Movies For Grownups® Awards 20th Anniversary Celebration

For two decades, AARP’s Movies for Grownups program has championed movies for grownups, by grownups, by advocating for the 50-plus audience, fighting industry ageism and encouraging films that resonate with older viewers. Get acquainted with the top movies, TV shows and talented people who have been nominated for the upcoming awards show.

“The Whole Body Reset”: Your New, Science-Backed Weight Loss Plan

You don’t have to gain weight as you age. That’s the novel idea behind “The Whole Body Reset.” The plan presents stunning new evidence about the power of “protein timing” for people at midlife, refutes the myth of slowing metabolisms, and changes the way people in their 40s and older should think about food. Read an exclusive excerpt of the upcoming AARP book in this issue of ATM.

Health Report – 10 Sneaky Signs You May Have Heart Disease

If you are experiencing bad breath, swollen ankles or hip pain, you may be noticing the early signs of heart disease. AARP’s health experts identify 10 little known signs to watch out for that may indicate the presence of heart disease.

Money Special – The Only Tax Guide You’ll Ever Need in Your 50s 

With tax day approaching, AARP’s resident financial and money specialists reveal whether you can save more on your income taxes this year; share 10 crucial truths about our tax system; give the lowdown on how to reduce property and sales taxes; and help you improve your thinking – and possibly, get a little more mellow – about taxes in general.

Fraud Watch – The Truth About Police-Support Calls

AARP’s Doug Shadel warns you to be wary of the latest telemarketing blitz in America – police-support calls. While persuasive callers may position their request as a charity initiative, many are actually from organizations that pocket virtually all the money. These “scam Political Action Committees” operate on the edge of the law, with little oversight. Here’s how to respond to such calls, and find out for yourself how to best support your local police.

Big Cities on Little Budgets

The secret to an awesome vacation in Chicago, New York or Los Angeles without spending a fortune? Act like a local! Travel writers living in these and other major U.S. cities share their secrets for enjoying their home town by skipping the tourist traps and finding the hidden (and low-cost) joys, be it food, activities, or neighborhoods to stay in.

Blue Collar by Day, Red Carpet by Night

Albanian immigrants Tefta Bejko and Bujar Alimani share their real-life story of working service jobs in order to support their family and fund their award-winning films. Against the challenges they have faced, the couple has perservered to fulfill the needs of their family and achieve their dreams in Hollywood.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-Winning Actress Halle Berry Opens Up About How She Found Happiness and Balance at 55

Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-Winning Actress Halle Berry Opens Up About How She Found Happiness and Balance at 55

LOS ANGELESFresh off the heels of her latest film Bruised, Oscar, Emmy and Golden Globe-winning actress Halle Berry spent time with AARP The Magazine (ATM) to talk about her “life-changing” role, directorial debut and evolving career directions. Globally known and celebrated for her captivating performances, the actress also shared an intimate look into her home life, opening up about her long path to joy as a parent, partner and professional. In the exclusive ATM cover story, she looks ahead optimistically, noting that for the first time in decades, she has achieved balance between her professional, family and emotional lives.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s February/March 2022 cover story featuring Halle Berry. The issue is available in homes starting in February and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On lessons in motherhood:

“My kids have been my greatest teachers. Before the world silences them, they’re truth tellers. And if as adults we’re present and we listen to what they’re saying, we can learn a lot about ourselves and about the world we live in.”

On representation and diversity in Hollywood:

“Women of color are doing things, and you know what? They’re doing things on their own terms, in their way, and on projects that are reflective of them or their culture or their gender. They’re daring to say, “I deserve this.””

On finding true love and real connection in the midst of quarantine:

“We spent four months talking on the phone. We were forced to let only our brains connect and discover if we had a connection before our bodies decided to get involved. I’d never done it this way. I fell in love with his mind, his conversation. I really believe I’ve found my person.”

On making her directorial debut:

“Directors I respected told me, “For your directorial debut, let it be something you love and something you know about.” From the moment I read the script, it was a part of me. I was aching to tell it.”

On maintaining the female perspective in “Bruised”:

“I was determined not just to hire as many women as I could, but to also make sure that the story stayed very female and was told from a specific female point of view, that we talk about things that are very feminine. We went to dark places because that’s what women do. That’s our sensibility. I also wanted an all-female soundtrack and female composer, so that the sound of this film that supported these characters in this world would be female.”

On addressing domestic violence authentically in her work:

“This story was a world I knew—domestic violence, for one thing. Not only have I worked with a shelter for 25 years, but it’s how I grew up as a young child, with an alcoholic, violent father. As a kid, I saw my mother beaten up and I know the horror and helplessness a kid feels. I remember my mother feeling humiliated by what her children had to witness. While some people might watch it and think, That’s harsh, it felt normal to me, which is how I knew it was true.”

On her relationship with her mom:

“My mother is one of the strongest women I know. She’s white, my dad was Black, and in the ’60s and early ’70s she was raising two little Black kids after my dad left and she was alone, a single mom. Parts of her family disowned her. The Black side of our family didn’t want anything to do with her. I watched her struggle, be strong, face adversity, persevere, never quit, keep going. I know that’s where I get my perseverance from.”

On playing physically demanding roles in “X-Men,” “John Wick” and now “Bruised”:

“Kicking, punching and pushing myself to my limits has always been a great, healthy release. Like men, women have a lot of pent-up anger and angst and sadness. I needed a healthy way to get this stuff out of my body. Sweating and working out is also fuel for me. And I’m addicted to those feel-good endorphins.”

On the beauty of aging:

“We’re all going to get older. Our skin is going to shrivel up and we’re going to look different. I refuse to become someone who just tries to hold onto a youthful face and not embrace what’s most important about being beautiful—how you live your life, how you give back to others, how you connect to people, how you strengthen your mind, body and soul and nourish yourself, how you give in a meaningful way of yourself. The most beautiful people have something radiating inside.”

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About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Lily Tomlin to Receive AARP The Magazine’s Movies for Grownups® Awards Career Achievement Honor

Lily Tomlin to Receive AARP The Magazine’s Movies for Grownups® Awards Career Achievement Honor

2021’s Best Movies and TV for Grownups to be Honored During the 20th Anniversary Special on March 18 from Great Performances on PBS

WASHINGTONAARP The Magazine announced today that Lily Tomlin will receive this year’s Movies for Grownups® Career Achievement Award. Tomlin — a critically acclaimed actress and comedian across TV, film and theater, and recipient of eight Emmy Awards®, two Tony Awards®, a Grammy Award®, among many others — will be honored at the 20th Anniversary Special of the annual Movies for Grownups® (MFG) Awards, broadcast on Friday, March 18, 2022, at 9 p.m. ET, by Great Performances on PBS.

“We are thrilled to honor Lily Tomlin, a trailblazer whose six-decade career as an actress, comedian, writer and advocate continues to break through boundaries today,” said AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins. “She’s an icon across mediums – as fresh, innovative, and influential today as when she revolutionized TV on Laugh-In in the ‘60s. In her current role on Grace and Frankie, in which she portrays issues of aging with respect, originality and hilarity, she continues to dismantle outdated stereotypes, demonstrating why she remains at the leading edge of pop culture.”

For two decades, AARP’s Movies for Grownups program has championed movies for grownups, by grownups, by advocating for the 50-plus audience, fighting industry ageism and encouraging films — and now TV shows — that resonate with older viewers.

Ms. Tomlin said, “I am honored to receive this award from AARP. There are so few grownups in the world. I am happy to be one. I feel I am not only a grownup, but I am mature for my age and that’s the truthhhhh!”

Tomlin will receive Movies for Grownups’ highest honor at the virtual awards ceremony, which will also include recognition for 2021’s best films and television series, including best actor, best actress, best director, best picture/best movie for grownups, best series, best TV movie/limited series, and more.

She joins a prestigious list of previous AARP Movies for Grownups Career Achievement honorees, including George Clooney, Annette Bening, Kevin Costner, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, Shirley MacLaine, Helen Mirren, Robert Redford, Susan Sarandon and Sharon Stone.

Lily Tomlin, one of America’s foremost actresses, has conquered a wide range of media, starring in television, theater, motion pictures, animation, video and social media. Throughout her extraordinary career, Tomlin has received numerous awards, including: eight Emmys, with 25 Primetime and five Daytime nominations over 50 years; a Tony for her one-woman Broadway show, Appearing Nitely; a second Tony for best actress, a Drama Desk Award and an Outer Critics Circle Award for her one-woman performance in Jane Wagner’s The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe; a CableACE Award for executive producing the film adaptation of The Search; a Grammy for her comedy album, This is a Recording, and nominations for her albums Modern Scream, And That’s the Truth,  and On Stage; and two Peabody Awards, for Edith Ann’s Christmas (Just Say Noël), and The Celluloid Closet. She earned a 1976 Oscar nomination for Nashville, plus the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in 2003. In 2014, she received the Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, DC., followed by a SAG Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. 

Tomlin is critically acclaimed for her work across television (The West Wing, Malibu Country, Grace and Frankie, Web Therapy), stage (Appearing Nitely, The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, The Search), as well as film (Nashville, 9 to 5, The Incredible Shrinking Woman, Big Business, Shadows and Fog, Short Cuts, The Beverly Hillbillies, The Kid, The Walker, Pink Panther II, Admission, Grandma, among others).

Upcoming, Tomlin will star alongside her Grace and Frankie and 9 to 5 co-star Jane Fonda in Moving On. Reuniting with her Grandma and Admission director, Paul Weitz, Tomlin and Fonda play two old friends who reconnect at a funeral and decide to get revenge on the widower who wronged them decades before.

Tomlin is well-known for supporting philanthropic organizations, particularly those focused on animal welfare, civil rights, health care, protection of elephants, women’s issues, AIDS-related organizations, environmental concerns, overcoming homelessness and supporting the LGBTQ community in all aspects of life.

The virtual ceremony will be hosted by Alan Cumming and will be broadcast by Great Performances on Friday, March 18, 2022, at 9 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings), pbs.org/moviesforgrownups, and the PBS Video app as part of #PBSForTheArts, a multiplatform campaign that celebrates the arts in America.

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About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.orgwww.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

About The WNET Group

The WNET Group creates inspiring media content and meaningful experiences for diverse audiences nationwide. It is the community-supported home of New York’s THIRTEEN – America’s flagship PBS station – WLIW21, THIRTEEN PBSKids, WLIW World and Create; NJ PBS, New Jersey’s statewide public television network; Long Island’s only NPR station WLIW-FM; ALL ARTS, the arts and culture media provider; and newsroom NJ Spotlight News. Through these channels and streaming platforms, The WNET Group brings arts, culture, education, news, documentary, entertainment and DIY programming to more than five million viewers each month. The WNET Group’s award-winning productions include signature PBS series Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend and Amanpour and Company and trusted local news programs MetroFocus and NJ Spotlight News with Briana Vannozzi. Inspiring curiosity and nurturing dreams, The WNET Group’s award-winning Kids’ Media and Education team produces the PBS KIDS series Cyberchase, interactive Mission US history games, and resources for families, teachers and caregivers. A leading nonprofit public media producer for nearly 60 years, The WNET Group presents and distributes content that fosters lifelong learning, including multiplatform initiatives addressing poverty, jobs, economic opportunity, social justice, understanding and the environment. Through Passport, station members can stream new and archival programming anytime, anywhere. The WNET Group represents the best in public media. Join us.

For further information: Paola Groom, AARP Movies for Grownups®, 202-434-2555, pgroom@aarp.org; Justin Solar, R&C PMK, justin.solar@rogersandcowanpmk.com