Shop & compare 2021 plans with the Medicare Plan Finder

Medicare’s Open Enrollment starts today! Now’s the time to review your Medicare health and drug coverage and look for other plans that may better meet your needs. The Medicare Plan Finder helps you compare 2021 coverage options and shop for plans.

Medicare Plan Finder is mobile friendly, so you can use it on your smart phone, tablet, or other mobile device. It guides you step-by-step through the process of shopping for and comparing plans. It has a simple, easy-to-read design to help you learn about and select options that are best for you.

Use Medicare Plan Finder to browse Medicare coverage options and find 2021 Medicare plans. Create a more personalized experience by creating or logging into your online account. When you create an account, you can:

  • Build a better prescription drug list. We’ll make suggestions based on prescriptions you filled within the last 12 months.
  • Modify your drug list and save changes.
  • Compare benefits and costs in your current plan to other plans available in your area.
  • See prices based on any help you get with prescription drug costs.

When starting your Medicare health and drug plan search in Medicare Plan Finder, here are some new features you can expect:

  • Quickly find information in the plan results. We’ve updated the 2021 Medicare plan results to make the information about each plan easier to read and scan. The results are also now automatically sorted by the lowest premium + drug cost, to show you plans with the lowest overall costs first.
  • Select up to 5 pharmacies at a time to find 2021 Medicare plans with the lowest drug costs. Choosing pharmacies helps us estimate what your drug costs will be in each plan. You can now add up to 5 pharmacies at a time, and quickly and easily change the pharmacies you chose to find plans that have the lowest cost to fill your drugs. You can also search by distance to your home to find the pharmacies closest to you, or by pharmacy name if you want to find a specific pharmacy.
  • More filters make it easier to find only the plans with everything you need. We’ve added new benefit options, so you can make sure the plans you’re comparing will cover what you need. You can also filter by plan type, like HMO or PPO, and see a quick overview about how each plan type works. Need drug coverage? There’s a filter to see only plans that include drug coverage. If you take insulin, select the “Insulin savings” filter to find plans that participate in a new model that can help you save on your insulin costs.

Visit the Medicare Plan Finder to start comparing 2021 Medicare health and drug plans now.

Don't forget your mental health care

Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world, affecting 1 out of 6 adults. Now more than ever, it’s important to know the signs of depression and when to get help. There are many different depression symptoms, like:

  • Feelings of sadness or guilt
  • Loss of interest in activities
  • Change in weight
  • Being more or less active than usual
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Suicidal thoughts

If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor about getting a depression screening. Medicare covers a depression screening once per year, and you pay nothing if your doctor accepts assignment. Medicare also covers other mental health services, so get the care you need.

Don’t put off your yearly mammogram—it’s too important to miss!

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women. Getting your yearly mammogram is the best way to find breast cancer early.

Mammograms are breast cancer screenings that can detect a lump up to 3 years before you or your doctor can feel it. This helps to detect breast cancer early, when it’s most treatable.

Medicare covers mammograms

Help lower your risk by:

  • Exercising
  • Limiting your alcohol intake
  • Keeping a healthy weight
  • Getting a yearly mammogram

Women between the ages of 50-74 should have a mammogram each year, and Medicare covers mammograms at no cost if your doctor accepts assignment. Talk to your doctor about the benefits of getting your yearly mammogram, and to schedule your next screening.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Help fight breast cancer and get your yearly mammogram!

Open Enrollment includes new coverage option for people with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)

With Open Enrollment approaching, knowing your options for Medicare coverage is important, especially if you want to change your plan. Starting this Open Enrollment, if you have ESRD, you can enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan during Open Enrollment (October 15 – December 7, 2020) for coverage starting January 1, 2021.

In many cases, you’ll need to use health care providers who participate in the plan’s network and service area. Before you enroll, you may want to check with your providers and the plan you’re considering to make sure the providers you currently see (like your dialysis facility or kidney doctor), or want to see in the future (like a transplant specialist), are in the plan’s network.

Remember, you can choose to get your Medicare coverage through Original Medicare, or you can choose to get coverage through a Medicare Advantage Plan.

Original Medicare includes Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance). You can buy supplemental coverage from a private company to help pay your out-of-pocket costs. If you want drug coverage, you can add a separate Medicare drug plan (Part D).

A Medicare Advantage Plan is an all-in-one alternative to Original Medicare. These “bundled” plans include Part A, Part B, and usually Part D. Most plans offer extra benefits—like vision, hearing, dental, and more. Learn more about what Medicare Advantage Plans cover.

Learn about your Medicare coverage options, see how Medicare Advantage Plans work for people with ESRD, and shop for plans.

Get ready! Medicare’s Open Enrollment starts October 15.

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Avoid the Part D late enrollment penalty—keep creditable prescription drug coverage

Do you have creditable prescription drug coverage? It’s drug coverage that’s expected to pay, on average, at least as much as Medicare’s standard prescription drug coverage. It could be drug coverage you get from a current or former employer or union, or from TRICARE, the Indian Health Service, or the Department of Veterans Affairs.

If you don’t have creditable coverage, you may want to join a Medicare drug plan now to avoid the Part D late enrollment penalty, even if you don’t use a lot of prescription drugs. People who have and keep creditable prescription drug coverage, or who get Extra Help to pay for their prescriptions don’t have to pay this penalty.

How do I know if my prescription drug coverage is “creditable”?

Your drug plan must tell you each year if your drug coverage is considered creditable coverage. They may send you this information in a letter, or draw your attention to it in a newsletter or other piece of correspondence. Keep this information, because you may need it if you join a Medicare drug plan later and want to avoid the Part D late enrollment penalty. If you have creditable prescription drug coverage when you first become eligible for Medicare, generally you can keep it without paying the late enrollment penalty if you sign up for Part D later.

The cost of the late enrollment penalty depends on how long you went without Part D or creditable prescription drug coverage. In general, you’ll have to pay this penalty for as long as you have a Medicare drug plan.

Learn how the Part D late enrollment penalty is calculated and more about the ways to avoid the penalty.

Inside the October/November Issue of AARP The Magazine: Exclusive Interview with Bruce Springsteen on Love, Loss, Aging and New Album “Letter To You”

Inside the October/November Issue of AARP The Magazine: Exclusive Interview with Bruce Springsteen on Love, Loss, Aging and New Album “Letter To You”

PLUS: Drew Barrymore opens up; Al Roker focuses on family; The final days of Stan Lee

WASHINGTON—Inside the October/November issue of AARP The Magazine (ATM) is a heartbreaking six-part account on the alleged elder abuse of the Marvel Comics visionary Stan Lee, an exclusive interview with music legend Bruce Springsteen, exciting 2020 medical breakthroughs to celebrate in the midst of the pandemic and an interview with Drew Barrymore on her next role as a daytime talkshow host. Plus, a spotlight feature on influential black voices including Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. Du Bois and Langston Hughes, whose words continue to inspire change and justice.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Bruce Springsteen
The 71-year-old artist welcomed AARP The Magazine to his home and horse farm in New Jersey for a conversation on his career, family, marriage, friendships, new album and more.

What I Know Now: Drew Barrymore

With nearly four decades in the spotlight, the “E.T.” star ventures into her newest role as a daytime talk show host. Barrymore opens up to AARP The Magazine about her life in 2020: health, motherhood, quarantine, becoming wiser and more mature and more.

Royal Life Lessons

At 94, the world’s longest-reigning royal still follows ten rules for staying vital, according to the author of a new book, Long Live the Queen. AARP The Magazine reveals the secrets of Elizabeth II, the indomitable 94-year-old monarch.

The Last Days of Stan Lee

As we approach the second anniversary of the death of Marvel mastermind, Stan Lee, AARP The Magazine dives into the heartbreaking final years of one of Hollywood’s greatest character creators. Why was he signing autographs at so many public appearances well into his 90s? ATM investigates the truth behind his large team of advisors and the elder abuse that many believe occurred.

Medical Breakthroughs 2020

While 2020 has exposed the cracks within the broken national health system, AARP The Magazine takes an optimistic look at some exciting medical breakthroughs that are already saving lives. New treatments for breast cancer, prostate cancer, macular degeneration, heart disease, lung disease and more are amongst this year’s medical wins.

The Other Epidemic

The pandemic, the economy, politics and concern about our families have put nearly every American into a heightened emotional state, notes fraud columnist Doug Shadel. And that is exactly how scammers want us; no wonder consumer fraud has risen during the pandemic to arguably its highest level ever. Shadel explains the psychology of fraud and gives advice on how to protect yourself in these fraught times.

Black Voices Matter

Over the summer, the nationwide protests spurred by the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery gave renewed urgency to address racial injustice in America. ATM is spotlighting influential black voices whose words continue to inspire change and justice, including Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes and more.

National Parks

Many Americans have been working from home for over six months and desperately need a change of scenery. For those who want to get away and also stay safe, AARP The Magazine has the adventurers’ ultimate guide to national parks, highlighting nine less-traveled but incredibly beautiful national parks to visit on your next road trip.

Personal Best: Al Roker

Longtime TODAY Show anchor, Al Roker, opens up to ATM about how quarantine has given him invaluable bonding time with his 18-year-old son Nick, who is on the autism spectrum. The duo has created a regular IGTV series called “What We’re Cooking,” where they share their favorite recipes, grilling tips, advice on what to do with Sunday leftovers and more. “I’m so proud of the person Nick is becoming, and so glad I have this extra time to see him maturing into an adult,” says Roker. “He’s self-sufficient, and he’s stretching into new areas. He’s enjoying life and seeing he can do different things.”

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.

October Issue of AARP Bulletin Features Donald Trump and Joe Biden in Their Own Words on Social 'Security, Medicare, the Economy and Coronavirus

October Issue of AARP Bulletin Features Donald Trump and Joe Biden in Their Own Words on Social ‘Security, Medicare, the Economy and Coronavirus

PLUS: AARP Provides Complete State-by-State “How to Vote” Guides for the 2020 Elections

WASHINGTON—With election season in full swing, AARP Bulletin is continuing its tradition of spotlighting the issues most important to older adults in exclusive interviews with President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden. In a Q&A format, both candidates discuss their views on Medicare, Social Security, nursing homes, the coronavirus pandemic, voting and many more crucial topics. Find out, in their own words, where they stand in the October issue of the Bulletin. 

PLUS: 

The Bulletin continues to publish unique, detailed “how to vote” guides for 53 U.S. states and territories to help older voters know exactly what steps to take (and when) in their state to cast their votes safely and on time. Voters in 26 states received their guides in the September issue, and now voters in the remaining 27 states and territories will receive theirs in the October issue. All 53 “how to vote” guides are available to the general public online.

Other stories in the October AARP Bulletin include:

Your Health

  • How Health Conditions Affect Your COVID Risk: It’s no secret that underlying health conditions make people more vulnerable to COVID-19, but now doctors are starting to understand exactly why that is. Learn how diabetes, obesity, respiratory problems and other illnesses interact with the coronavirus — and what to do about it.

Your Money

  • How to Return Products Bought Online: COVID-19 has sparked more online shopping – and more returns. Returning items is usually pretty easy, but mistakes still happen, and the pandemic has added new challenges. To avoid any problems, the Bulletin provides eight “gotchas” to beware of, from when your return is rejected to when the company goes bankrupt. 
  • What to do When Retirement Comes Early: COVID-19 has pushed many older workers into retirement years before they had planned, and new retirees may be wondering: How can I afford the gap between now and the age I thought I’d be retiring? AARP Bulletin offers pointers on spending, health coverage, retirement savings, Social Security and more in the October issue.
  • Signing Away Your Day in Court: Did you know that most contracts today bar you from suing a company if something goes wrong? In the October issue, the Bulletin answers your questions about arbitration clauses, what your rights are under them, and what to do before and after you sign. 

Fraud Watch

  • Use Your State Regulators: When people think about who fights fraud, their mind usually goes to federal regulators like the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). But state securities regulators can be the best places to go if you’re a victim of investment fraud. Learn why in the October issue of The Bulletin.

Your Life

  • How to End the Password Madness: The average older American now has more than 200 digital accounts with passwords, some dating back over a decade. How to keep them safe and sorted? Learn the three methods that experts say are the only ones you can truly trust.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.

Set a reminder—it’s time to get ready for Medicare Open Enrollment.

Medicare Open Enrollment runs from October 15 to December 7, but did you know you can get an early look at next year’s health plans and prescription drug plans starting on October 1?

Premiums for Medicare Advantage Plans are dropping to historic lows for 2021. This type of Medicare health plan, offered by a private company that contracts with Medicare, is an all-in-one alternative to Original Medicare. These “bundled” plans include Part A (Hospital Insurance), Part B (Medical Insurance), and usually Part D (prescription drug coverage). Most plans offer extra benefits—like vision, hearing, dental, and more.

Starting on October 1, you can take an early peek at Medicare health plans and drug plans by using the Medicare Plan Finder. If you have a Medicare Number, you can log in or create an account to put together or access a list of your drugs, compare your current Medicare plan to others, and see prices based on any help you get with drug costs.

If you’re among the 1 in 3 people with Medicare who has diabetes, here’s some more good news: starting in 2021, many participating drug plans will offer a 30-day supply of insulin for $35 or less per month. If you take insulin and enroll in one of these plans, you could save an average of $446 per year on your out-of-pocket costs for insulin next year.

Ready to get started? Set a reminder on your phone for October 1 or jot a note on the top of your October calendar, and get ready to compare and save on Medicare health plans and Medicare drug plans.

EXCLUSIVE: Bruce Springsteen Shares About Love, Loss, Aging and the Challenges of Writing his New Album in At-Length Interview with AARP The Magazine

EXCLUSIVE: Bruce Springsteen Shares About Love, Loss, Aging and the Challenges of Writing his New Album in At-Length Interview with AARP The Magazine

LOS ANGELES— Music legend Bruce Springsteen, known for hits including “Born To Run,” “Thunder Road,” and “Badlands,” as well as five decades of exhilarating live performances, is making an exciting return to his native genre with a new rock album, “Letter To You,” releasing Oct. 23. The 71-year-old welcomed AARP The Magazine to his New Jersey farmhouse overlooking 378 acres of beautiful horse country, for a socially distanced conversation on his career, family, marriage, friendships, new album and more.

With 20 GRAMMYs, two Golden Globes, a Tony Award, an Oscar, inductions into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and more than 150 million records sold worldwide, Bruce Springsteen is a music icon. In his 20th studio album, “Letter To You,” the esteemed songwriter and the E Street Band make a powerful return to rock ‘n’ roll with 12 new tracks that touch on the great mysteries of life and death, the shedding of past lives, the passage of time and looking forward.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s October/November 2020 cover story featuring Bruce Springsteen, written by Editor in Chief Bob Love. The issue is available in homes starting in October and available online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On his return to writing rock and roll songs:

“It’s part of the anxiety and mystery of the job that I do – which is a magic trick, because you take something out of the air that isn’t there… You can go for long periods without picking up anything significant. Or you’ll just pick up different things. It’s like you’re in a mine and one vein has gone dry, so you tap into another. A pop vein or a folk vein, and so you start working there… But because I am primarily a rock ‘n’ roll musician when I’m operating sort of at my peak—I like to…every once in a while, come up with some rock songs.”

On his long career:

“I heard something of mine from 1975 on a record the other day, and I said, ‘That was about seven or eight lives ago. It was a full and entire life of its own.’ And I lived that one, and it was a great one, and now I’m living another one. I lived a life where we raised our children. That life is gone now. Now Patti and I are living another life. So, you live a lot of lives over the course of your one life.”

On loss of loved ones:

“So, this idea is you don’t lose everything when someone dies. You do lose their physical presence, but their physical presence is not all of them, and it never was all of them, even when they were alive. Spirit is very strong. Emotion is very strong. Their energy is very strong. And a lot of this, particularly for people who are very powerful, really carries over after death. It’s like my friend George passes away and leaves me with all of these songs. Clarence passes away and leaves me with these songs. Danny passes away, leaves me with these songs. And what are songs but dreams, at the end of the day? It really is all my dreams that I put down on paper and on tape.”

On finding inspiration in today’s economic climate:

“You have your antenna out. You’re just walking through the world and you’re picking up these signals of emotions and spirit and history and events, today’s events and past remembrances. These things you divine from the air are all intangible elements: spirit, emotion, history. These are the tools of the songwriter’s trade before he even picks up the pen.” 

On recording new album, “Letter To You”:

“We spent one week in the studio—five days—and cut the entire record. It was all live, no overdub vocals and just a few overdub instruments. It’s the first truly live, in-the-studio record of the band we’ve ever made.”

On self-care and therapy:

“The talking cure—it works. But you’ve got to commit yourself to a process. And I was pretty good at doing that. I enjoyed the investigative examination of issues in my life that I didn’t understand. I learned a lot and therefore was able to exploit what I had learned and turn it into a real life.”

On his post-pandemic plans:

“All I can tell you is, when this experience is over, I am going to throw the wildest party you’ve ever seen. And you, my friends, are all invited.”

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.