Entries by mgl

Mad Money Host and Stock Guru Jim Cramer Offers AARP Bulletin Readers Shocking Advice: Consider Reducing Your Investments!

Mad Money Host and Stock Guru Jim Cramer Offers AARP Bulletin Readers Shocking Advice: Consider Reducing Your Investments!In an Exclusive Interview in the December Issue, Cramer Reveals Why He Sold a Large Chunk of His Personal Portfolio, and Why You Might Consider It as WellWASHINGTON—In a candid, wide-ranging interview, Mad Money host Jim Cramer disclosed to AARP Money Editor George Mannes that at age 65, he reluctantly reduced the ratio of his retirement savings in stocks to 50 percent– in large part due to pressure from his wife to reduce their financial risk.

“I believe everybody has to sit down with their partner, and both people have to be comfortable,” Cramer said in describing the decision. “I could have easily said to Lisa, ‘I have a TV show, I worked at Goldman Sachs, I was a hedge fund manager. This is what we’re going to do.’ And I’ve come around to thinking that that’s wrong, that money’s a partnership, and that the partnership has to be over the dinner table, and everybody has to be happy.”

In the interview, Cramer also discusses why he is optimistic about the U.S. economy, who his long-running TV show is and isn’t for, why many people SHOULDN’T try to pick individual stocks to purchase, and his thinking for how older Americans can improve their financial security without taking undue risks.

Cramer’s interview is part of a special Bulletin cover section on ways you could protect your money in the coming year.  Also discover 10  things to do right now to get your finances in top shape for the new year; 10 money mistakes many smart people make, and how to avoid them; and 8 essential tools and services to help you get the best possible handle on your money situation.

Also in the December issue:

Fraud Watch

Holiday shopping scams are back: Last year, the losses from holiday shopping scams topped $250 million. They’ve made their return this year: The AARP Fraud Watch Network has been swamped with calls about online rip-offs. In this month’s issue, take a look at some of the tricks and tactics that scammers use so you can protect yourself this year.

Your Health

A post-pandemic guide to better sleep: COVID-19, the challenging economy, and two years of drastically changed daily schedules have wreaked havoc on America’s sleep. Doctors and health experts reveal new thinking and fresh techniques on how to achieve a full, healthy night of sleep, no matter what your age or situation.

Your Life

Stories from pearl harbor survivors: Fewer than two percent of Americans who served in World War II are still alive. For those who are, Pearl Harbor signifies the day when their lives changed forever. On the 80th anniversary of that day, AARP tracked down survivors and others whose lives were immediately affected by the attack and asked for their stories and lessons. Hear the tales of a survivor of the sinking USS Arizona, a Navajo code talker, and a woman who broke German code.

Your Technology

15 surprising uses for your smartphone:  Remember Swiss Army knives, and all their amazing uses they have? Well, consider smartphones their successor: in this special guide, you’ll learn how to use any smart phone to measure distances, become a magnifying glass, find the nearest bathroom, send out an emergency beacon, record conversations, and much more. PLUS: a special report on how to organize and manage the apps on your phone (Americans now average more than 80 per person!).

###

About AARPAARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Michael J. Fox Gets Serious

Michael J. Fox Gets SeriousIn the December-January Issue of AARP The Magazine, The Actor and 2022 AARP Purpose Prize Honoree Continues To Inspire With Optimism and Hope – Even on the Heels of Personal ChallengesLOS ANGELES—Michael J. Fox is always positive, always optimistic, always inspiring — until he’s not. In a profound, wide-ranging, often funny interview with AARP The Magazine, Fox discusses how he has emerged from a period of health and emotional challenges that included recovering from major surgery and a shattered left arm that required a steel plate and 19 screws to repair with even greater focus and a deeper understanding of his purpose and joys. As he approaches the 30-year anniversary of his Parkinson’s Disease diagnosis, Fox still finds new ways to enjoy life and make a difference.

Fox spent several decades of his celebrated career telling stories on screens, but as he approached his 60th birthday this June, his increasingly unreliable speech forced him to retire from acting. Led by his growing sense of gratitude, the critically acclaimed actor has found his present purpose – pioneering research for his self-titled foundation which is dedicated to finding a cure and improved therapies for his disease.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s December/January 2022 cover story featuring Michael J. Fox. The issue is available in homes starting in December and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On getting through the darkness:

“As I came through that darkness, I also had an insight about my father-in-law, who had passed away and always espoused gratitude and acceptance and confidence. And I started to notice things I was grateful for and the way other people would respond to difficulty with gratitude. I concluded that gratitude makes optimism sustainable.”

On finding optimism:

“If you don’t think you have anything to be grateful for, keep looking. Because you don’t just receive optimism. You can’t wait for things to be great and then be grateful for that. You’ve got to behave in a way that promotes that.”

On keeping his career alive:

“When I couldn’t act the way I used to act, I found new ways to act.”

On starting the Michael J. Fox Foundation:

“We created what has become this giant network of patients, scientists and institutions. We’ve put more than a billion dollars into it. And patients are the key. Now they guide our agenda and have been critical, for example, to our promising work in trying to find biomarkers for Parkinson’s, which would allow us to identify the disease in people before symptoms are evident, and to treat it pro-actively and get rid of it. And we’ve got a lot of treatments that have gone through the FDA, and we’ve developed a great relationship with pharma researchers on Parkinson’s drug development. There are now better drugs and more effective treatments for a lot of the side effects and other aspects of the condition, and we helped make that happen.”

On his legacy:

“I hope people will enjoy my work as an actor and get something from it. At a deeper level, I hope people see sincerity in the things I’ve said and done. If I’ve positively helped anybody with Parkinson’s, that’s great, too. … Beyond that, and this is kind of a vanity thing – a lot of really great guitarists have come up to me over the years and said they picked up the guitar because of the “Johnny B. Goode” scene in Back to the Future. If I did anything in this life, I got John Mayer to pick up the guitar.”

# # #

About AARPAARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Act fast! Review your Medicare plan by December 7.

Medicare Open Enrollment is almost over. If you’re thinking about changing your Medicare plan, you have until December 7 to take these actions:Change how you get your Medicare coverage—Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan
Switch Medicare Advantage Plans (with or without drug coverage)
Join, switch, or drop a Medicare drug plan
Even if you’re happy with your current health coverage, it’s important to know your Medicare coverage options and compare other health and drug plans during Open Enrollment. You may find Medicare coverage that better meets your needs for the upcoming year.

Compare Medicare health & drug plans for 2022

Not all Medicare coverage options offer the same benefits, and costs can change each year. There may be other health and prescription drug plans available to you for 2022. 

Compare Medicare coverage options and find 2022 health and drug plans by December 7. If you like your current health care coverage and it’s still available in 2022, you don’t need to take any action.

Need help with your Medicare choices? Talk to someone.

Find 2022 Plans Now

An AARP Bulletin Special Report: Are We Close to Beating Cancer?

On the 50th anniversary of the U.S. declaring war on the disease, doctors and experts weigh in on progress, disappointments, and what we’ve learned about who cancer strikes and why. WASHINGTON—When President Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971 into law, he boldly declared a “war on cancer.” 50 years later, AARP Bulletin writers report that while the progress is real and encouraging, scientists underestimated the complexities and nature of the disease. Today, they note cancer is a “disease of aging,” and that as we live longer, the incidence of the disease is still rising. But new treatments and approaches have greatly increased survival rates for most – but not all – cancers.

This November, the Bulletin offers a comprehensive report on the 50 years of advancements in cancer research, and how the battle against the disease still has room for improvement. Learn about:

How increased knowledge about the different types of cancer has led to a massive increase in the supply of available treatments,
New research to determine which cells are most likely to turn cancerous – knowledge that could someday lead to medicines or processes that prevent cancer,
Why older adults are often given suboptimal care when treated for their cancer, and
How to improve your own situation if you are diagnosed with the disease.

Also in the November issue:

Your Money

Help Really Wanted: Job-seeking older adults might find that this is the best time to start looking for work – not just because of the number of job opportunities, but also because they have better bargaining power for workplace flexibility. In this month’s issue, learn how to take advantage of the unprecedented uptick in job postings, avoid common application pitfalls and spot discriminatory hiring practices.
Tapping Your Home’s Value: Suddenly, most American homeowners see themselves as tens of thousands of dollars richer, thanks to 18 months of surging home prices. But should they tap into those home-value gains, and if so, how? Finance expert Linda Stern confirms that it might be a good time to borrow against your home, but do so smartly. This edition of “Financially Speaking” breaks down the pros, cons and processes.
Steer Clear of Fakes: As online shopping has surged, so have sales of counterfeit products. It can be difficult to spot fake products, as the red flags are often hidden from shoppers. What’s worse, counterfeits – such as electrical products – can sometimes put the buyers’ safety at risk. Learn what precautions you should take when online shopping in this month’s issue.

Your Life

Feeling Lonely? Try Connecting With A Kid: The pandemic has uncovered a public health crisis that has proven to be detrimental to a vulnerable population: loneliness among older adults. That’s why some groups have started intergenerational programs that pair younger adults with older ones. Read this month’s issue of “Your Life” for the free-to-use programs that promote healthy interaction and combat social isolation.

Fraud Watch

Finally, Extra Phone Protection: This summer, phone companies took on scam callers. The federal government mandated that carriers offer anti-spoofing technology in their phones, blocking callers with false phone numbers. This month, the Fraud Watch experts discuss how the tool came to be implemented nationally, and other ways carriers are fighting back against scam callers.

###

About AARPAARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

It’s time to shop & compare plans for 2022

Medicare’s Open Enrollment is now – December 7. Review your Medicare health and drug coverage and compare it with other plans that may better meet your needs. During Open Enrollment, you can make these changes for your 2022 coverage:

Change how you get your Medicare coverage—Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan
Switch Medicare Advantage Plans (with or without drug coverage)
Join, switch, or drop a Medicare drug plan
Review your options

Even if you’re happy with your current Medicare coverage, it’s important to review your coverage options for 2022. Here are a few reasons why:

Your needs may change. You may find you’re going to the doctor more or less often, the prescription drugs you take may be different, or you may need better access to health care services.
Benefits and costs can vary. Not all Medicare coverage options offer the same benefits. Plan benefits and costs can change from year-to-year. If you have a Medicare plan, check your Annual Notice of Changes (ANOC) to see what’s different for 2022.
New, more affordable Medicare plans may be available. The total cost, provider network, and services offered are different between plans. Check if other plan options could better meet your needs or lower your out-of-pocket costs.
If you like your current health care coverage and it’s still available in 2022, you don’t need to take any action.

Shop & compare plans in your area

Compare 2022 coverage options and shop for plans. Get estimates of costs and review benefits offered by Medicare health and drug plans in your area. You can even compare plans based on their star rating for quality and performance.

If you log into (or create) your secure Medicare account, you can:

Save your current prescriptions and favorite pharmacies.
Get cost estimates for each plan based on the drugs you take and pharmacies you use.
See your costs if you get Extra Help with prescription costs.
Find & Compare 2022 Plans

Boost your protection from COVID-19

If you got the Pfizer vaccine, get ready to help increase your protection with a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot. Medicare covers a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster shot at no cost to you if you’re 65 and older OR for certain people at high risk, at least 6 months after you complete your second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series. (Note: Don’t mix vaccines. Your third dose should be the Pfizer vaccine if your first two doses were Pfizer.)Learn more about who should get a Pfizer booster shot.

There are several reasons why you should get a booster shot. You may have built enough protection after your vaccination earlier this year, but that protection decreases over time against mild and moderate disease (this is called waning immunity). Also, while COVID-19 vaccines remain safe and remarkably effective against severe illness, hospitalization, and death, no vaccine is 100% effective at preventing infection. The Delta variant causes more infections and spreads faster than earlier forms of the virus that causes COVID-19, so we all need to stay on guard.

If you’re unvaccinated or just partially vaccinated, it’s critical for you to get your first round of vaccine shots right away, to lower your risk of COVID-19 and its more severe outcomes. Nearly all cases of severe disease, hospitalization, and death continue to occur among those who aren’t vaccinated.

To get your booster shot, or to start with your first set of vaccine shots, visit Vaccines.gov to find COVID-19 vaccine providers near you.

AARP Bulletin Special Report: An Essential Guide to Making Smart Medicare Choices Today and Tomorrow

AARP Bulletin Special Report: An Essential Guide to Making Smart Medicare Choices Today and TomorrowPlus: An exclusive interview with the new chief of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid ServicesWASHINGTON—Are Medicare Advantage Plans – the choice for health coverage by some 42 percent of Medicare enrollees today – delivering on their promises of excellent care at less cost to taxpayers? On the 25th anniversary of legislation that created these programs that allow private health networks to be all-in-one care providers to Medicare enrollees, AARP takes a deep look at their performance, and compare the benefits and services they provide to those with Original Medicare. While many Advantage plans offer vision, hearing and dental benefits that are not funded for original Medicare enrollees, experts note other limitations and issues that make the plans the less-preferable choice for many older Americans.

The Special Report also details top reasons why Medicare enrollees might consider changing their coverage during open enrollment (which runs each year from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7). We break down the specific care you will get from original Medicare versus Medicare Advantage plans for eight of the most common health care needs and issues. The extensive report also reveals AARP’s agenda for a stronger, healthier Medicare program. And, in a candid interview, CMS Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure details her plans and thoughts about the future of the program.

Other stories in the October issue:

Fraud Watch

Fed or Fraud? The AARP Fraud Watch Network has seen a recent surge in phone calls from older Americans complaining of imposter scams in which the criminal claims to be from a trusted government agency, such as Medicare, the IRS or the Social Security Administration. In this issue, AARP Director of Fraud Victim Support Amy Nofziger explains why this is happening, shares callers’ stories and offers tips to spotting and stopping these scammers in their tracks.

Your Money

Relax About Your Credit Score: As Americans become more dependent on having credit to make important financial decisions, it can be easy to obsess over having the “perfect” credit score. In this “Financially Speaking,” finance columnist Linda Stern breaks down why there’s no need to stress on the ideal number.
Property Taxes in a Hot Market: If homes in your neighborhood are suddenly selling for far more than they were valued a year ago, does that mean your home is more valuable too – and so subject to higher property taxes? The answer may be yes. In this report the Bulletin details why property taxes are suddenly such a hot topic, and how to protect yourself from tax surprises, whether buying a new home or staying put.

Your Health

Long in the Tooth: With the pandemic causing missed annual dental appointments, many have turned to pursuing their own methods to achieve a bright smile. Take a look at these safe, DIY tips that could help mitigate some of the most common tooth-related problems.

# # #

About AARPAARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.

Get ready! Medicare’s Open Enrollment starts October 15.

You can enroll in Medicare health and drug plans from October 15 – December 7. Get ready for Medicare’s Open Enrollment with these 5 tips:Check your mail. You may get important notices from Medicare or Social Security. If you’re in a Medicare plan, you’ll get an Annual Notice of Changes (ANOC) telling you of any changes in coverage, costs, or service area. Note any 2022 changes to your health coverage or any Extra Help you may get to pay for prescription drugs.You may also get brochures and other marketing materials from insurance companies that offer Medicare health and prescription drug plans. Remember — plans aren’t allowed to call or come to your home without an invitation from you. Find out how to protect yourself from Medicare fraud.
Think about your Medicare coverage needs for 2022. Carefully review your current Medicare coverage, and note any upcoming changes to your costs or benefits. Decide if your current Medicare coverage will meet your needs for the year ahead. If you like your current coverage, and it’s still available for 2022, you don’t need to take any action to keep it.
Review your 2022 “Medicare & You” handbook. It has information about Medicare coverage and Medicare plans in your area. If you want to get your handbook electronically, you can go paperless by logging into (or creating) your secure Medicare account.
Preview 2022 health and prescription drug plans. We make it easy to compare coverage options and shop for health plans. For a personalized search, log in or create an account (if you have a Medicare Number) to create or access a list of your drugs, compare your current Medicare plan to others, and see prices based on any help you get with drug costs.
Get personalized help in your community. You may be able to find free information and events online, or get help from health insurance counselors in your area by phone, like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program.
Visit Medicare.gov to sign up to get important news & updates by email from Medicare.

AARP The Magazine Celebrates Latin-American Icons in Special October/November Issue Featuring Salma Hayek, Carlos Santana, Johnny Pacheco and More

AARP The Magazine Celebrates Latin-American Icons in Special October/November Issue Featuring Salma Hayek, Carlos Santana, Johnny Pacheco and MorePlus: Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares a COVID Vaccine Update, Brooke Shields offers 6 Tips to Living Your Best Life, and Ricky Gervais Gets Personal WASHINGTON—To mark Hispanic Heritage Month, the October/November issue of AARP The Magazine (ATM) highlights numerous influential Latin-American icons, including cover star Salma Hayek who shares a rare look into her life as a professional Latin-American woman in Hollywood. And in an exciting exclusive, AARP commissioned ten of the world’s most prominent Latino artists to create portraits of legendary Latino actors, artists, leaders, athletes, musicians and activists who have made a lasting global impact. To tell their unique stories, AARP turned to current luminaries such as Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos, Carolyne Roehm, and Bobby Valentin.

Also in this issue of AARP The Magazine: tips to brew a perfect cup of coffee, tales of unforgettable vacations, the year’s top medical breakthroughs, key steps to achieving online security, and more.

In this issue of AARP The Magazine:

Cover Story: Salma HayekAARP The Magazine sat down with October/November cover star Salma Hayek to discuss her inspiring journey, advocacy and career in Hollywood. The 55-year-old Latin-American multi-hyphenate opens up about her latest projects, behind and in front of the screen, and the importance of portraying female experiences such as menopause as authentically as possible.

Latin-American Icons

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine is spotlighting influential Latin-American voices and amplifying their contributions to the community. Video conversations with Carlos Santana, Edward James Olmos and Bobby Valentín and more are available online at AARP.org/HispanicHeritage as a part of the special October/November Issue.

5 Steps to Online Security

Did you know a single computer file surfaced on the Internet this past summer that contained 8.4 billion stolen passwords? To help you protect against the increasing possibility that thieves already have your password information, AARP’s resident fraud expert Doug Shadel has put together a specific five-point plan for updating and securing all your digital passwords in ways that best thwart the bad guys.

Brooke Shields

Actress, model and mother Brooke Shields emphasizes the importance of positive body image and reveals her six tips to live your best life. Shields reveals how finding quiet, staying grounded, learning to love her body, and pivoting into every new life chapter has shaped her at age 56. She returns to the screen this November with “A Castle for Christmas” (Netflix).

Ricky Gervais

Known best for making audiences both laugh and blush around the world, British comedian Ricky Gervais has made a household name for himself by having few barriers. In an exclusive conversation with ATM, Gervais discusses how his life experiences gave him the building blocks for his thriving career in entertainment, why political affiliations should stay out of comedy, and where he is now at 60-years-old. His Netflix show “After Life,” which he created, directed, wrote and stars in, returned for its third and final season in 2022.

Medical Breakthroughs

In an exclusive adaptation from his new book, Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells the behind-the-scenes story of how a Covid vaccine emerged just one year after the virus emerged. Plus our annual roundup of new medical procedures, tests, technology and drugs that are changing the face of disease in America and around the world.

The Man Who Brings Back The Dead

Amateur artist Carl Koppelman has developed a national reputation among detectives, medical examiners and fellow sleuths for his unique ability to to create realistic portraits of people, using only their remains for guidance. In so doing, he has help investigators solve over a dozen “missing persons” cases. In this extraordinary long-read tale, you’ll meet a fascinating cast of characters, learn of missing-person cases that have bedeviled police for decades, and discover an undergound world of amateur detectives determined to help solve these cases. And you’ll also meet a man who only found his cause later in life as a caregiver to his mom, tapping into artistic skills that lay dormant for decades.

# # #

About AARP

AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.​

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The Magazine

Latin-American Actress and Activist Salma Hayek Opens Up About Power, Womanhood and Fighting Her Way to Success in the Special Hispanic Heritage Issue of AARP The MagazineHow She Approaches Aging, Navigates Hollywood, and More in the October/November IssueLOS ANGELES—In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, AARP The Magazine sat down with October/November cover star Salma Hayek to discuss her inspiring journey, advocacy and career in Hollywood. In a wide-ranging interview, the 55-year-old Latin-American multi-hyphenate details her latest projects, both behind and in front of the screen, and the importance of portraying female experiences such as menopause as authentically as possible.

After surviving a near-death COVID-19 scare, Hayek has returned to the screen with numerous projects including “Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” “Eternals,” and the upcoming “House of Gucci.” She continues to pursue women-driven narratives with her company, Ventanarosa, as well as undertaking additional humanitarian and advocacy initiatives. A devoted mother, Hayek is also working to instill her desire to help others in her own children.

The following are excerpts from ATM’s October/November 2021 cover story featuring Salma Hayek. The issue is available in homes starting in October and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.

On being a humanist:

“I am a feminist, but that’s not why I work with women. I work with them because I’m a humanist. And if men were the ones who were not given the same human rights, I’d be fighting for them.”

On diversity in the industry:

“‘We’ve got the Latino box checked; we’ve got the African American box checked.’ It’s an acknowledgment that these voices are important, and that I applaud. But I wish we could find a space where people feel, My voice also has to do with you, and your voice also has to do with me.”

On authentic portrayal of the experience of menopause:

“When I was going through menopause myself, I wondered, How come nobody talks about this in the movies?”

On her experience with COVID-19:

“I realized that we are so fragile—not just as individuals but collectively. I was thinking more about the global experience than about my own personal mortality, because this is what a pandemic forces you to do.”

On learning how to find the right opportunities and being grateful for every experience:

“I learned every single day from every single person on the crew … even the bad movies gave me so much. They also gave me the humbleness to say, ‘OK, it’s not going to advance my career. But thank you for allowing me to pay my rent.’”

# # #

About AARPAARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation’s largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org, www.aarp.org/espanol or follow @AARP, @AARPenEspanol and @AARPadvocates, @AliadosAdelante on social media.